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seen Apr 3 at 17:33

Apr
2
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
29
comment Determining the spring constant in an oscillation problem
@PranavHosangadi Many thanks.
Oct
29
accepted Determining the spring constant in an oscillation problem
Oct
29
awarded  Commentator
Oct
29
comment Determining the spring constant in an oscillation problem
I calculated the period is $\frac{oscillations}{time} = \frac{14}{19}$. This tells me $\frac{2*\pi}{T} = \frac{2*\pi*19}{14} = \frac{19*\pi}{7}$
Oct
29
asked Determining the spring constant in an oscillation problem
Sep
26
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
12
awarded  Yearling
Jan
22
comment Where inside a large uniformly dense, symmetrical sphere would its gravity toward the center be the strongest?
Sorry to those who feel the question is worded so incorrectly. Apparently I do not understand how to write it correctly but those who answered it understood it just fine. If it is unclear then feel free to edit it yourselves.
Jan
21
accepted How do I approach this conservation of energy problem, symbolically
Jan
21
revised Where inside a large uniformly dense, symmetrical sphere would its gravity toward the center be the strongest?
title
Jan
21
accepted Where inside a large uniformly dense, symmetrical sphere would its gravity toward the center be the strongest?
Jan
21
comment Where inside a large uniformly dense, symmetrical sphere would its gravity toward the center be the strongest?
My question is the first paragraph plus the caveats. After the line breaks are my thoughts.
Jan
21
revised Where inside a large uniformly dense, symmetrical sphere would its gravity toward the center be the strongest?
massive core
Jan
21
asked Where inside a large uniformly dense, symmetrical sphere would its gravity toward the center be the strongest?
Jan
17
comment Block on a block problem, with friction
@symplectomorphic That is an interesting example, I will need to write out the problem and see if it depends on the top mass being less than the bottom. But basically you are saying that if I apply a very small force on the top block, over time as the force gets larger and larger the top block will slide off the bottom.
Jan
17
comment Block on a block problem, with friction
@symplectomorphic In the case that the surface under the bottom block is frictionless? What force is stopping the bottom block from moving with the top block no matter what force is being applied (to the top block) in the horizontal?
Jan
17
comment Block on a block problem, with friction
@Chris Gerig Does this imply that no force applied to the top block in the same horizontal direction as the defined x-axis will cause the top block to move with respect to the bottom block? Intuitively I feel that enough impulse would achieve this, is that not good intuition?
Dec
5
awarded  Self-Learner
Dec
5
answered How do I approach this conservation of energy problem, symbolically