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seen Jul 21 at 7:54

Hi all. I graduated from the University of Oregon in June 2012 with a degree in math and a minor in physics. While I have no plans to continue my formal mathematics education, I would like to go to grad school for physics, which I assume entails learning and using new mathematics. I do love math, but I simply prefer the grounded nature of physics.

I was lucky enough to get to study various topics in college, though as a result I didn't study them as in-depth as I would have liked. In particular, in senior year I took classes for real analysis (intro level), differential equations (applied emphasis) and differential geometry. As far as physics, I've taken classes that cover classical mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, a small amount of special relativity, and I am currently working through Griffith's quantum mechanics book. I also did a short project investigating the chaotic nature of a double pendulum.

Lastly, I'm currently preparing for the physics GRE, and the amount you are expected to know is straight up insane. If anyone has any tips or resources beyond the four practice tests, they are much appreciated.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
10
awarded  Teacher
Jan
19
comment What is the change in flux through a loop that has been rotated?
You're drawing isn't wrong. What you have found in the angle between the field lines and the plane once it has been moved. However, the angle which the plane is rotated is 90-44 degrees.
Jan
18
answered What is the current through the lamp?
Jan
18
comment What is the current through the lamp?
Yeah ok so this problem, is like I said a little silly. It seems like you have to assume the current drops to zero in the given time and therefore so does the flux. This gives you the first part.
Jan
18
awarded  Scholar
Jan
18
accepted Bernoulli's equation and reference frames
Nov
27
revised Application of diffraction problem!
just added "degrees" to the end of the phrase: "...provided the Sun diameter is 0.5 [degrees]"
Nov
27
suggested suggested edit on Application of diffraction problem!
Nov
23
answered Circular polarization: properties and detection
Nov
22
comment about polarization of light
If that is the case, then that explains why user1285419 isn't seeing the result on his/her oscilloscope. So to answer the question, then: the reason you aren't seeing a lissajous figure is that the laser operates at a frequency to which the circuit responds poorly. However, YES, it is the correct way to visualize polarization with the restriction I mentioned above.
Nov
22
revised about polarization of light
added 258 characters in body
Nov
22
answered about polarization of light
Nov
22
answered Force on a bar magnet
Nov
13
comment Bernoulli's equation and reference frames
@VijayMurthy; yes that seems to answer my question. thank you.
Nov
13
comment Bernoulli's equation and reference frames
@Mike Dunlavey; Ok the part about the air blowing in being the same as the air blowing makes sense, otherwise my car would implode/explode. But maybe this is a better question: If I'm driving with the windows closed and can instantly open them (maybe by smashing them or something), which way will the air flow initially?
Nov
13
awarded  Student
Nov
12
asked Bernoulli's equation and reference frames
Nov
3
answered So do I use this Lorentz's law or which law do I use?
Sep
26
awarded  Supporter