118 reputation
4
bio website aaronegolden.com
location Duvall, WA
age 29
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen 6 hours ago

Professional software developer focusing on iOS for the last (approximately) five years. Right now I work for Inkling. I also work on the Subliminal iOS integration testing framework.


Mar
28
comment Can computers accurately model all of the details (to the subatomic level) of macro objects in collisions?
I don't think people are being quite fair to the question. It's not about whether or not we could do it now (or whether it would be practical to do it in the future). The question is whether or not such a simulation can exist in principle, where the simulation apparatus is smaller than the objects being simulated. I suspect the answer is "Yes, but not if you require real time simulation." My intuition is that the information content of the simulated system should not be compressible in general, but you might be able to "trade time for space." But IANAP, so maybe an expert can answer.
May
24
awarded  Autobiographer
May
15
awarded  Scholar
May
15
awarded  Supporter
May
15
accepted Is a compact universe consistent with the results of (for example) the Michelson-Morley experiment?
Apr
26
asked What were Feynman's objection(s) to a cubic lattice universe?
Feb
28
awarded  Student
Sep
30
comment Relationship between Alcubierre drive space-time evolution and speed of gravity
Can't we measure the speed of the wavefront by observing it as it passes through otherwise undisturbed space? If the disturbance detected is small compared to the (Euclidean) distance between detectors (and, I suppose, small compared to the volume of the detection apparatus itself) and the detectors are at rest relative to one another then we should be able to approximate the wavefront's propagation speed as the Euclidean distance between detectors divided by the time between detection events.
Sep
30
asked Relationship between Alcubierre drive space-time evolution and speed of gravity
Sep
12
comment Is a compact universe consistent with the results of (for example) the Michelson-Morley experiment?
@John: I didn't know when I wrote the question that there was this constraint on, shall we say, "reasonable" universes. Let me see if I understand. For various reasons the only metrics worth considering for empty space are of the FLRW form, and a consequence is that the global geometry is either elliptical, Euclidean, or hyperbolic. Only the elliptical global geometry might be compact, so if the universe is compact we should be able to measure the uniform (positive) curvature of empty space, unless the radius of the universe is much larger than the observable universe. Is that right?
Sep
11
comment Is a compact universe consistent with the results of (for example) the Michelson-Morley experiment?
@QuantumDot, that confuses me too. For example one could realize a topological torus as a cube where opposite sides are identified with each other. In such a space the geodesics would be Euclidean straight lines, but according to the paper in the question there would still be a preferred inertial reference frame. However, if the observable universe failed to intersect a side of the cube then I don't see how observations could distinguish that space from an infinite flat space. So maybe there would be a preferred inertial reference frame but still no way to observe it.
Sep
11
asked Is a compact universe consistent with the results of (for example) the Michelson-Morley experiment?