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bio website nayefcopty.com
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visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen May 2 '13 at 13:04

C, C++, iOS (Objective-C, Cocoa Touch), x86 Assembly, Java, Bash


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accepted Sinusoidal Wave Displacement Function
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comment Sinusoidal Wave Displacement Function
We're going off topic. My question is a simple sine or cosine function. I'm not a physics expert.
Sep
11
comment Sinusoidal Wave Displacement Function
Well assume that the initial phase IS 0 and not "when its 0"...?
Sep
11
comment Sinusoidal Wave Displacement Function
Oh okay thanks now I understand. Well... at t = 0, when the initial phase is 0, would a sinusoidal wave still always be cosine, or would it still depend/vary on the conditions?
Sep
11
comment Sinusoidal Wave Displacement Function
...which would be written as a cosine function (including the initial phase)? Or can I see the same function above you gave as a sine function, depending on the question?
Sep
11
comment Sinusoidal Wave Displacement Function
I am aware of the identity, but sin(x) and cos(x) on their own, are not equal. Therefore, sin(kx - wt) is not equal to cos(kx - wt). So when I'm given a question say: Write down the displacement function of a sinusoidal wave with A = 2.0, k = 4.0 and w = 1.5, would I write it as y(x,t) = 2.0cos(4x - 1.5t) or y(x,t) = 2.0sin(4x - 1.5t)? Forget about trig identities: I do not understand whether sinusoidal waves are ALWAYS cosine (as the book highlights a cosine function) or may be sine and differs per each function (which I should determine from a graph/given in the question)
Sep
11
asked Sinusoidal Wave Displacement Function