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Feb
18
answered Good reference on the parametrization of $SU(3)$ and $SU(N)$
Feb
17
awarded  Commentator
Feb
17
comment Good reference on the parametrization of $SU(3)$ and $SU(N)$
Are you asking for unique parametrizations? Otherwise, can't you just go with $e^{\theta_i T_i}$ where $T_i$ are the $N^2-1$ generators of the algebra?
Feb
13
comment How strong were the gravitational waves that LIGO detected at the source?
Leaving aside the non-gravitational effects, what would the momentum transfer due to the passage of the wave be? Say at 100,000 km, where the strain is only 0.01%, so presumably nothing held together by ordinary solid state forces gets torn apart? You've got 3 solar masses of energy-momentum flowing outward... Is there some sort of "immaculate" momentum transfer to a nearby object, where it gets a boost without feeling much of anything by the wave's passage?
Nov
10
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
23
answered Unruh radiation and conservation of energy
Nov
19
answered Vector Boson Fusion
Nov
19
comment Octave equivalence: biological or more?
You say "the question remains... why not the fifth?" What's the question? Octaves sound similar, but not identical. So do fifths. Both facts seem to be explained by the harmonic relationship, along with non-linearity in the inner-ear response so that even pure external tones produce responses at harmonics within the cochlea.
Oct
31
answered Zero Point Fluctuations
Oct
31
revised Is there an intuitive explanation for the Southward force caused by the Coriolis Effect on rotating spheres?
Added a remark.
Oct
31
comment Why does renormalization need an unbroken symmetry?
Technically it's not broken. The physically observable particle states are gauge invariant combinations of the background higgs & the bare particle states, neither of which is separately gauge invariant. I think there's a theorem to the effect that gauge invariance can't be broken. I think the "common wisdom" has to do with the fact that you generally need some symmetry in order to prevent quadratic - and therefore fine tuned - renormalizations. phi^4 theory is perturbatively renormalizable but has no symmetries. But it has quadratic mass renormalization.
Oct
31
answered Is there an intuitive explanation for the Southward force caused by the Coriolis Effect on rotating spheres?
Oct
30
awarded  Yearling
Oct
29
answered Is single photon annihination of electron-positron pair prohibited by Feynman diagram analysis?
Oct
12
answered Does the color of a quark matter in a meson?
Oct
6
answered Rotating hoop in Relativity
Oct
3
comment Collision between Neutron stars and Black holes
Google "gravitational inspiral binary neutron star". You'll get lots of links. The first hit is from LIGO.
Sep
7
awarded  Editor
Sep
7
awarded  Scholar
Sep
7
awarded  Student