617 reputation
210
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen 2 days ago

Feb
27
revised Experimental Measurement of Quantum phase transition in an optical lattice
added 81 characters in body; edited title
Feb
19
comment Griffiths phase
Why is Bose glass a Griffiths phase?
Feb
18
revised Theorem of inclusion in the disordered Bose-Hubbard model
edited tags
Feb
17
asked Theorem of inclusion in the disordered Bose-Hubbard model
Feb
7
comment Why Landau Level quantization is observed only in low temperature and strong magnetic field in real experiment?
@EverettYou can composite fermion understood by the charge attaching magnetic flux filled in the lowest Landau level?
Feb
7
asked Experimental Measurement of Quantum phase transition in an optical lattice
Feb
7
comment What is the difference between atomic limit and hard core boson limit?
In hard-core limit Hamiltonian, the interaction term can vanish, but one has to use the constraint n=0 or 1, and the Hilbert space will be truncated.
Feb
6
comment What is the difference between atomic limit and hard core boson limit?
Why is the chemical potential fixed to $U/2$ in hard core bosons?
Feb
5
revised What is the difference between atomic limit and hard core boson limit?
added 9 characters in body; edited title
Feb
5
asked What is the difference between atomic limit and hard core boson limit?
Dec
7
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
22
asked How to realize long-range interaction of colds atom in an optical lattice?
Nov
21
comment Some conceptual questions in BEC
:You are right. I am talking the BEC in context of cold atoms in an optical lattice. Each boson condenses to the zero momentum state, so the ground state can be described by $(b_{k=0}^{\dagger})^{N}|0\rangle$. In each lattice site, the many-body wave function is a coherent state, so the ground state can be described by a product of single-site states over the entire lattice $\prod_{i}|\Phi\rangle_{i}$
Nov
21
comment Some conceptual questions in BEC
Thanks! If all the bosons are in the same state described by $\Phi$, the the many-body wave function should be the product of identical single particle states: $\psi=(\Phi)^N$, wherer N is the total number of bosons. Actually the $\Phi$ in your answer is the single-site many-body wave function which is equivalent to the coherent state in second quantization, and it is a superposition of different atom number states.
Nov
21
asked Some conceptual questions in BEC
Nov
17
asked A commutation problem in Hubbard model
Nov
9
awarded  Critic
Nov
9
comment Selection rules in Stark effect
$L_{\pm}$ can only change m.
Nov
9
revised Selection rules in Stark effect
added 10 characters in body
Nov
9
comment Stark effect in two level atomic, laser-driven system?
How to understand the energy shift of the atom by the laser field?