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Dec
13
comment Am I faster than my shadow?
Imagine a much slower speed of light. If you accelerate, the speed of your head's shadow will be slower as the ground is recieving light (and information about the blockage of light) from yourself a few seconds ago. Note that I'm assuming detectors on the ground, not eyes, measure the speed of shadows.
Dec
13
comment Confined in a box, what is the average distance between a particle hitting a side?
That's only for the top edge of the square, and $\theta \ne 0$ anywhere on here, so there is no problem. For the other sides, make a phase shift of $\pi$ or $\pm \frac{\pi}{2}$
Dec
12
revised Confined in a box, what is the average distance between a particle hitting a side?
added 884 characters in body
Dec
12
revised Confined in a box, what is the average distance between a particle hitting a side?
added 884 characters in body
Dec
12
asked Confined in a box, what is the average distance between a particle hitting a side?
Dec
3
awarded  Caucus
Dec
3
awarded  Constituent
Dec
3
accepted Directionality of angular momentum
Dec
2
comment Directionality of angular momentum
A teacher. If it was a book I would cite it.
Dec
2
comment Directionality of angular momentum
The problem I was having is that he seemed to imply that the value [sum of all linear momentum] could grow or shrink to [sum of all angular momentum]'s loss or gain (losses/gains are equal in magnitude). On reflection, I think he may have just been wrong, but I wanted to check here that I wasn't being an ignoramus.
Dec
2
comment Directionality of angular momentum
It was an implicit assumption, as with any momentum conservation questions.
Dec
2
asked Directionality of angular momentum
Nov
30
accepted Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?
Nov
30
comment Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?
Thank you for the mathematical description. Is there nothing more to energy and work other than 'a value that is conserved' (although not conserved in the same way, or course)?
Nov
30
comment Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?
Where does the equation for work come from? Is that form its definition, or is it empirically based? And is kinetic energy defined by anything, or did physicists mould the equation for it around to fit an everyday thing?
Nov
30
revised Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?
added 66 characters in body
Nov
30
comment Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?
Sorry, I forgot to specify that I was considering about only conservative forces.
Nov
30
comment Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?
As an example of $(2)$, physics.stackexchange.com/questions/535/…
Nov
30
asked Is there a mathematical derivation of potential energy that is *not* rooted in the conservation of energy?
Nov
24
comment In classical mechanics, are complex numbers unphysical?
@tpg2114 Thanks for the answer.