Oct
10
comment The Z-Torque: how can it be shown intuitively that it does not work?
I thought about a longer explanation. However, honestly one would need to do finite element analysis and have complete knowledge of the properties of the material they are using to do it properly. However, if one assumed identical material with identical properties, with identical per unit length densities etc, one could show the differences in energy losses between the expansion and contraction of the material in about an hour or two or so (which unfortunately I don't have at the moment :-(
Oct
10
answered The Z-Torque: how can it be shown intuitively that it does not work?
Oct
10
comment Using Quantum Teleportation in a way to have the effect of matter teleportation
Here is a nice article on the subject. There have been various discussions on this topic off and on for several years. In principle its possible, in reality it is unlikely we would ever have sufficient scalability to quantum teleport a state as complicated as a human. I believe there are some papers floating around give crude estimates, but I am not aware of rigorous calculations.
Oct
9
revised Using Quantum Teleportation in a way to have the effect of matter teleportation
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Oct
9
comment Hawking radiation and reversibility
the evaporation processes are driven by complementarity, which becomes more significant as the black hole mass becomes smaller (which also implies a reduction in the number of potential subsystems). If we incorrectly viewed quantum uncertainty as the result of hidden variables, then a loss of information would be viewed as a loss of those hidden variables. QM says no, this is not possible, the complementarity is intrinsic and can not be lost, so the information associated with uncertainty is preserved.
Oct
9
comment Hawking radiation and reversibility
My latest take on this whole discussion is that what needs to preserved is the uncertainty principle (e.g. normally understood quantum complementarity). Information in the Shannon sense is viewed as freedom of choice, although we can distinguish between freedom of choice by the sender and noise (equivocation), the uncertainty is still viewed as information. From a classical point of view, the black hole represents a definite position and momentum state. The quantum argument is that complementarity is still preserved, and it could be potentially argued that (continued)
Oct
9
answered Using Quantum Teleportation in a way to have the effect of matter teleportation
Oct
7
revised Explanation of equation that shows a failed approach to relativize Schrodinger equation
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Oct
7
revised Explanation of equation that shows a failed approach to relativize Schrodinger equation
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Oct
7
revised Explanation of equation that shows a failed approach to relativize Schrodinger equation
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Oct
7
comment Reason for the discreteness arising in quantum mechanics?
@ ramanujan_dirac well the answer there is simply that we define a fundamental unit of action \hbar. This partitions the respective Hilbert/phase space (depending on use). This is, at some level, an arbitrary feature, however, experiment proves that this is how nature operates. As with most things in physics, the proof is usually not mathematical but empirical. At some level, the universe is the ultimate black box. We can ask it well formulated questions, and it will give an answer, but its inner workings are still too complex for use to determine.
Oct
7
comment Explanation of equation that shows a failed approach to relativize Schrodinger equation
please see below, hope that helps
Oct
7
answered Explanation of equation that shows a failed approach to relativize Schrodinger equation
Oct
7
comment Reason for the discreteness arising in quantum mechanics?
In reviewing some of the response and your replies, I am curious as to what you are actually after in the the question "But what actually is the reason for discreteness in quantum theory?" The current high scoring answers are tautological since they rely largely on the enforcement of boundary conditions of some sort. So its not entirely clear what the goal of the question is. I was wondering if you could clarify.
Oct
7
comment Reason for the discreteness arising in quantum mechanics?
@PeterShor Absolutely agree! The point that I failed to convey but was trying to make is that this question of why nature uses stationary states. We have ample experimental proof, and some proofs of stationary states arising in certain contexts but as far as a reason why this should occur in nature I suspect is unanswerable. I find the other responses to this question to be tautological. String theory is on the right track since at least it keeps this very fundamental.
Oct
6
revised Schrodinger and thermodynamics
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Oct
6
answered Schrodinger and thermodynamics
Oct
6
comment Reason for the discreteness arising in quantum mechanics?
The other postulate is that it arises in the dynamics of little tiny strings, which is perfectly consistent with all observations, but such things are still viewed as speculative.
Oct
6
answered Reason for the discreteness arising in quantum mechanics?
Oct
4
comment Is it possible to see domains in a metal/magnet under microscope
@rafiki A Kerr microscope is what you might thinking of. Here is another view.