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visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Apr 8 at 19:30

I'm a dilettante programmer with many other interests including but not limited to math, physics, Singularitarianism, AI, music, and gaming.


Apr
24
revised Finding the wavelength of an electron in its ground state?
deleted 3 characters in body
Apr
24
comment Finding the wavelength of an electron in its ground state?
Given an average radius of the ground state ($5.29*10^-11m$) could I use the aforementioned method? Moreover, you mentioned finding the uncertainty in position - would $ΔxΔP = h/4π$ be of use here somehow?
Apr
24
revised Finding the wavelength of an electron in its ground state?
edited body
Apr
24
asked Finding the wavelength of an electron in its ground state?
Feb
26
asked The universe's lack of an 'edge', and how that relates to the multiverse?
Feb
26
revised Meaning of subscript in $V=\frac{1}{2}\left(\frac{d^2 V}{{dq_i}{dq_j}}\right)_0$
added 224 characters in body
Feb
26
awarded  Commentator
Feb
26
comment Meaning of subscript in $V=\frac{1}{2}\left(\frac{d^2 V}{{dq_i}{dq_j}}\right)_0$
Oops, I guess. It's changed now though. Also, and I just now realized this, but in Physics we have Epsilon nought which obviously does not mean initial permittivity of free space! I'll make a futile edit.
Jan
11
accepted At what rate does a rotating black hole lose mass via Hawking Radiation?
Dec
11
revised Using thermodynamics and Kinematics together to solve a parachuter problem?
deleted 5 characters in body
Dec
11
comment Using thermodynamics and Kinematics together to solve a parachuter problem?
No rates were given. All we were given was the ideal gas law formula, the drag formula, the density formula, a formula for Earth's radius according the the latitude, and the position equation ($x= xi + vit + .5at^2$). We were meant to find the rates individually and then use them to find other rates etc. in order to finally arrive at displacement.
Dec
11
comment Using thermodynamics and Kinematics together to solve a parachuter problem?
True, but the problem here is that pressure, density, and temperature are all changing, and those rates are not given (this is a related rates problem for calculus.) I'll try just finding Temp though. But, what can I do about not having velocity?
Dec
11
comment Using thermodynamics and Kinematics together to solve a parachuter problem?
Pressure, Volume, molar weight of atmosphere, number of moles, gas constant, drag coefficients, and avg density are given (among some others).
Dec
11
asked Using thermodynamics and Kinematics together to solve a parachuter problem?
Nov
25
awarded  Supporter
Nov
25
comment At what rate does a rotating black hole lose mass via Hawking Radiation?
That makes sense. However, I went to your wikipedia link, and my doubt was rekindled. You had $dM/dt = Pc^2$ due to energy-mass equivalence. Wikipedia has $P = -(dE/dt) = -c^2(dM/dt)$. Therefore, according to wikipedia, $dM/dt = P/-c^2$
Nov
21
comment At what rate does a rotating black hole lose mass via Hawking Radiation?
As Lubos mentioned, do in your power equation do we also equate G and c to 1? Also, is my $dM/dt = (c^2(dR/dt))/(c^4)$ wrong and why? Also, how can you defend your rate of mass loss? No offense, but a few answers have emerged and they all seem promising.
Nov
16
comment At what rate does a rotating black hole lose mass via Hawking Radiation?
I actually didn't use $G$ to get $R$. I first heard that $R = 2GM/c^2$, but I later read that it was equal to $2M$. I'm not so sure that $R = 2M$ is correct. I'll re-run the necessary parts of my work with the other formula for $R$. Anyway, if I what should I use $G = 1$ in and where? All I did was use $R$ to find $dM/dt$ in your mass loss rate formula. My big problem now is finding $dR/dt$ so that I can find the rate the volume decreases in relation to mass loss.
Nov
16
comment At what rate does a rotating black hole lose mass via Hawking Radiation?
So, regarding your second to last formula, if Energy to be radiated away is given by $R$ when $D = 4$ does that mean that the rate of mass loss is given by $dM/dt = (c^2(dR/dt))/(c^4)$ when you factor in Energy - Mass equivalence? Also, is the $R$ in your formula radius or redshift factor? I have no background in upper level physics, so this is intense speculation.
Nov
16
comment At what rate does a rotating black hole lose mass via Hawking Radiation?
I don't need all of that to find the mass loss rate do I? Bottom line, what is the formula? Call me lazy, but I'd really like a formula that can model the mass loss rate itself. I don't want to derive your horizon formula to get dm/dt. There has to be something easier. At least I hope there is.