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A student and enthusiastic programmer. Love learning Physics! And I make android apps as a hobby.

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Jul
14
comment SMBC ball bouncing problem
After 490 bounces the ball will be left with $0.5J$ of energy, where will that go?
Jul
14
comment Education : Students devising and solving their own problems
Hmm...nice answer. I'm still in high school, so I haven't really thought about tackling more real life problems. I will surely keep that in mind during my higher education! +1 for enlightening me!
Jul
14
answered Education : Students devising and solving their own problems
Jul
13
comment SMBC ball bouncing problem
You should ask this as another question. Maybe someone else can explain it better.
Jul
13
comment SMBC ball bouncing problem
There is a normal force exerted on the ball during each bounce. That is what reverses the velocity of the ball, simultaneously decreasing the magnitude.The vertical velocity is being altered after every bounce, both in sign and in magnitude.
Jul
13
comment SMBC ball bouncing problem
@redd.it, Maybe I should rephrase: The kinetic energy corresponding to the vertical component of velocity changes by $1 joule$ and the kinetic energy corresponding to the horizontal component remains unaltered, simply because the vertical velocity changes and the horizontal velocity doesn't. The total energy still decreases by $1 Joule$.
Jul
13
comment SMBC ball bouncing problem
@fibonatic, I agree with you, the question should specify exactly what forces are being involved, or at least make it deductible from some data. As to the assumption that the velocity scales down by the same factor, the change in vertical velocity corresponds to the impulse $Ndt$ whereas the horizontal velocity change would correspond to the impluse $\mu Ndt$. How can we assume them to change by the same factor?
Jul
13
comment SMBC ball bouncing problem
@redd.it, there is no force in the horizontal to do work and dissipate energy(because I assume friction to be zero).
Jul
13
answered SMBC ball bouncing problem
Jul
13
comment How do ice spikes form?
@PhilipGibbs I thought the ice would firmly stick to the walls of the container due to normal forces resulting from sideways expansion, which happens AFTER a complete lump of ice has formed. Are the ice-container bonds strong enough to keep it in place without that happening?
Jul
13
comment How do ice spikes form?
why wouldn't it push the already frozen ice upwards?
Jul
13
comment How can you weigh your own head in an accurate way?
"No need for the $\approx$ sign"... hahaha. +1 for that. But I think Hooke's Method is actually possible, if you consider the skin and neck muscles loose enough, and can somehow find out an average value of stiffness of the human spine.
Jul
13
comment Is it possible for information to be transmitted faster than light by using a rigid pole?
@Shaktyai , check out this MinutePhysics video, which explains exactly the same paradox you state : youtube.com/…
Jul
12
comment Vectors with more than 3 components
You could think of a 4D vector as one connecting two points which are both spacially, and temporaly seperated. For eg. a vector joining $(0,2,3,t=0s)$ to $(2,4,5,t=2s)$. But it is quite difficult to represent this as a diagram.
Jul
12
comment What is the proof that a force applied on a rigid body will cause it to rotate around its center of mass?
I agree with @Gugg. If the body is rotating, every point will have an acceleration of $\omega^2r$ towards the instantaneous axis of rotation. It is truly not constant for all points on the rigid body.
Jul
12
revised Why is electric flux defined as $\Phi = E \cdot S$?
added 12 characters in body
Jul
12
comment Difference between Eulerian and Lagrangian formulation of Fluid Dynamics
You derived your formula for a fixed volume, i.e. $\Delta x, \Delta y, \Delta z$ do not change with time. But in that textbook derivation you provided, they have not considered them fixed. That's why those $v_x,v_y,v_z$ terms. Put them as $0$ and it turns into the same equation you got.
Jul
12
revised Double Slit experiment with just one photon or electron
Linked to video
Jul
12
suggested suggested edit on Double Slit experiment with just one photon or electron
Jul
12
revised What do we mean when we say the QM wave function is a section of the $U(1)$ bundle?
Formatting