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I am a graduate student studying astrophysics at Princeton. I received my bachelor's in physics and mathematics from Caltech (2011).


Feb
19
comment Notation for Propability Amplitudes
I would hope the instructor didn't just write that down in vacuo - was there some additional context?
Feb
19
comment What jobs can you get after Studying Physics at University?
While it may still be true that the subject is not important for jobs in industry, many colleges specialize far earlier than senior year. And outside the US this is even more universally true.
Feb
19
comment How are stellar and galactic ages determined?
@Lucidnonsense See the new second paragraph for Galaxies.
Feb
18
comment Why light can't go faster then 300 000 km/s? What prevents it?
I really want to say this is a duplicate of something - but I can't seem to find a well-worded question (or even many well-worded answers) on the site that deals with precisely the same thing. Everything just keeps linking back to that same addition-of-velocities on a bus thing.
Feb
18
comment If NASA could send a camera into a black hole, could we then see what's inside the black hole?
@CarlWitthoft But none of that matters. Jets and any other observables are produced outside the event horizon, by definition.
Feb
18
comment Why apply voltage on an Si detector only on atmosphere or high vacuum
I on the other hand have come across this phenomenon, in an undergrad lab in fact, where we had to turn off the detector only while pumping down to vacuum. Failure to do this would result in some unhappy equipment and an unhappy grade.
Feb
18
comment While holding an object, no work done but costs energy (in response to a similar question)
This just avoids the question. Why does energy need to be supplied in order to keep in the same thermodynamic state? One can imagine a simple model wherein the polymers in your rubber band tend to (entropically) shorten, but every time they begin down that path they are pulled taut again by a regulatory mechanism. Useful energy is turned into heat via all the little pushes required to keep deviations from tautness small. Gravity, on the other hand, alters the potentials so as to make spontaneous shortening unlikely. There is a fundamental difference.
Feb
17
comment Normal to the Hypersurfaces
$n^a \to n^c$ at the very beginning of your last equation?
Feb
17
comment Weibull distribution
For $0 < \nu < 1$ you seem to be asking for a Dirac delta function plus something else. That's a pretty tall order for just altering $k$ and $\lambda$. Or are you allowing more extreme modifications?
Feb
17
comment Is observation a component of the Lorentz transformation?
Closely related: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/59985/…
Feb
17
comment Self-adjoint and nonpositive differential operators
@MichaelScott Welcome to Physics StackExchange! As comments are somewhat ephemeral, it's always best to edit pertinent information into the body of the post. I also added the DOI link to protect against link rot, as per our (somewhat unofficial but very sound) policy.
Feb
14
comment How fast do large asteroids usually travel?
@AnthonyX You should turn your comments into answers :)
Feb
13
comment Does time exist in a vacuum?
It's a shame, but many physicists will have an immediate negative reaction to your question. If you define "time" to be the direction with the wrong sign in the metric for GR, then John Rennie's answer explains why the answer to your question is yes. If you define it based on a more limited set of observables like changing positions between objects (in the style of Leibniz, Mach, and (in his own mind at least) Einstein), the answer may very well be no. Which definition you take as "right," though, is a matter of philosophy.
Feb
13
comment What changes occur while an atom approches the speed of light?
There's nothing logically inconsistent about a universe with Bohr-style atoms obeying relativity. The OP's conceptual problem lies in Galilean vs. Lorentzian shifting of reference frames.
Feb
13
comment Gaussian Probability Distribution?
Is this the distribution that minimizes uncertainty? On that one note, Wikipedia has this to say: "The normal distribution saturates the [entropic uncertainty principle] inequality, and it is the only distribution with this property, because it is the maximum entropy probability distribution among those with fixed variance." Just don't get mixed up between information-theoretic entropy and Fourier/quantum standard deviations.
Feb
11
comment What is a phrase for testing for a certain result?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about non-physics-specific terminology. Depending on interpretations it is either about a psychology term or a statistical notion.
Feb
8
comment If Earth was the size of an orange, what consistency would it be?
This isn't a well-defined question, and can't be answered. The Earth is the size it is, and its scale is part of its essence. There is no unique definition of a "smaller Earth," or a "bigger hand."
Feb
8
comment Does an athlete's proficiency at luge depend on his mass?
+1, because this must be the dominant effect. On the other hand, I can imagine adjusting your height on turns might be useful, as it would adjust your moment of inertia around the axis you go around on the bank. I'd like to think luge athletes have to have some skill besides just being dense deadweights.
Feb
7
comment Can a spinor be defined as any quantity which transforms linearly under Lorentz transformations?
If you want to update the question, click the "edit" button right under it, rather than editing the answers. Keep in mind that often this isn't the best thing to do anyway. If you are expanding the scope and essentially asking a new question, just start a new question with a link back to this one if appropriate. If you are answering your own question, you should post it as a separate answer to this question (the answers need not be merged into one).
Feb
7
comment Do black holes exert an infinite amount of energy at the event horizon?
All those words, but none answers the question.