27,768 reputation
459104
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location Princeton, NJ
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 3 hours ago

I am a graduate student studying astrophysics at Princeton. I received my bachelor's in physics and mathematics from Caltech (2011).

My primary interest is in general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of black hole accretion.


10h
comment Numerical integration of divergent functions
This belongs on either math or sci comp.
1d
comment Water well fluid dynamics
This is not a hygiene question. The question is if seepage into a well from 100+ feet deep can explain well water that goes up to 15 feet deep, or if the observed high water levels indicate there must be a leak higher up. It is very much physics.
1d
comment How can laser interferomerty be used to measure path difference smaller than wavelength of laser light?
Have you ever seen the fringes from an interferometer? There's nothing stopping you from measuring a fraction of a fringe...
Jul
3
comment What happens to sound at speeds greater than mach 1?
I'm really confused by the close votes here. The sound is reversed, and the OP seems to understand this better than most users on this site.
Jul
3
comment Difference between Enzo & Gadget astronomy simulation codes
Ah that too. To be honest, I don't use either code (being an Athena dev myself), so I'm just going off a quick glance at their webpages.
Jul
3
comment Circle becomes Sphere in 3d?
In particular, that scene in the movie was all about how we normally draw wormholes as circles, since we suppress one dimension for convenience when using 2D paper. The circle $\to$ sphere conversion is just undoing that simplification. If we understood some other 3D $\to$ 2D process at work, we would undo it in some other way.
Jul
1
comment Book suggestion for introductory plasma physics
Note there are (at least) two main branches of plasma physics books these days: astrophysical plasmas and fusion plasmas. You kind of have to decide which application you want the theory grounded in.
Jul
1
comment Cosmological Bulk Viscosity - is the universe a fluid?
Protip: Just about anything on arxiv posted to gr-qc and cross-posted to astro-ph is pseudoscience. (Yes, this offends lots of people employed as "scientists." No, I will not back down on this claim.)
Jun
30
comment What are these arcs in bubble chamber photos?
To be clear, are you referring to the single most prominent arc in each picture?
Jun
30
comment How can I measure the ability of sunglasses to block UV radiation?
When you do find a method, be sure to test regular glasses too. (Both glass and plastic are generally rather opaque to UV, even without special treatment.)
Jun
26
comment How many human cells will get affected at the prick of a pin?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is about biology not physics.
Jun
24
comment How to measure the wavelength of a laser pointer?
If it was at all reasonably priced and you can tell what color it is (green vs. red etc.), then you can figure it out based on what wavelengths are available for sale. Only certain wavelengths are easy to manufacture.
Jun
23
comment How to derive the Schwarzschild radius?
I would actually argue that the event horizon is defined by the surface such that one can never escape from within to infinity. As it turns out, this matches the coordinate singularity in question, but it didn't have to. For example, the polar axis $\theta = 0,\pi$ is also a coordinate singularity in Schwarzschild coordinates, but it has nothing to do with the horizon.
Jun
20
comment Where do Maxwell's equations come from?
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/65335
Jun
19
comment Do we know what event caused the Sun and Solar System to form?
@AcidJazz The densest nebulae rival the best laboratory vacuums on Earth. As for the shockwave, clearly some stars (if nothing else the first star in the universe) formed without a supernova trigger, so it's more a matter of whether or not something gives gravity a shove in the right direction.
Jun
15
comment Why is the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) calculated like this?
Wow that's an awful wikipedia article. Just look at the formatting, the grammar, the unprofessional tone, not to mention the lack of capitalization of sentences. Probably better to delete the whole section than try to make sense of it.
Jun
15
comment Radioactive objects in a student's room
I guess as long as some sensible definition of "whole object" is understood it should be fine. Honestly, the answer is either "living tissue" or "the walls" if you include them depending on what the room is made of. To first order all living tissue is the same, the popular imagination's thoughts about bananas notwithstanding.
Jun
15
comment Radioactive objects in a student's room
I think the only thing wrong with this is using the metric "Bq/g" since then obviously the answer is a single stray atom of something highly unstable. Asking about dominant sources of radiation regardless of mass, however, is very important. As anyone who's ever worked in a radiation lab can tell you, the experimenter emits enough radiation to throw off numerous experiments.
Jun
13
comment How can we feel the effects of a Black Hole if all the mass is gone?
Nature, for all its fame, is the journal people in my field go to when they do shoddy work and can't get published in a real astrophysics journal. Also, we really do observe black holes: in fact we are on the verge of imaging them with angular resolution better than their size, which is more than can be said for all but a handful of stars.
Jun
12
comment Why does planetary spin affect the stability of orbits?
There's a good question here. Note though that there are two senses of "prograde" -- a moon orbiting a planet the same way the planet is spinning, and a moon orbiting a planet the same way the planet is orbiting the star. It's the second meaning that applies here. As it happens, though, most everything in the Solar System goes in the same direction, so the two definitions often coincide.