29,701 reputation
463111
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location Princeton, NJ
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 43 mins ago

I am a graduate student studying astrophysics at Princeton. I received my bachelor's in physics and mathematics from Caltech (2011).

My primary interest is in general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of black hole accretion.


Dec
14
reviewed Leave Open Applying Statistical Mechanics to Formulate Corrosion (Rusting)
Dec
14
comment How can we be Certain that Dark Matter Exists if we Cannot See it or Directly Detect It?
I feel like this should be a duplicate of something, but not the linked question. In fact, almost none of the evidence we have for dark matter comes from our own galaxy.
Dec
14
reviewed Leave Open How can we be Certain that Dark Matter Exists if we Cannot See it or Directly Detect It?
Dec
14
reviewed Close Good references for mathematics of sound attenuation?
Dec
14
reviewed Close Why don't we take force proportional to velocity?
Dec
14
answered Raising and lowering indices of the Levi-Civita epsilon symbol in two dimensions
Dec
14
reviewed Leave Open Raising and lowering indices of the Levi-Civita epsilon symbol in two dimensions
Dec
14
reviewed Leave Open What does observation mean in two-slit electron diffraction experiment?
Dec
14
reviewed Close Where did the Word 'Physics' Come From?
Dec
14
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
14
answered Infinite dimensional vector spaces vs. the dual space
Dec
14
comment What does this stellar mass distribution mean?
This agrees with my comments on the question, where I used Chabrier for the high-mass end.
Dec
14
comment What does this stellar mass distribution mean?
Similar with 8+ $M_\odot$ stars (if these are what your diagram calls "supergiants"): Chabrier says out of 1+ $M_\odot$ stars they should be 0.03% by number, 0.3% by mass, and your diagram has them at 3%. Again, Chabrier is way off from your diagram, but the mass interpretation is less off. It's also entirely possible I'm making a computational mistake...
Dec
14
comment What does this stellar mass distribution mean?
Hmm... Two answers say numbers, but the numbers I gave in answering another question of yours don't agree. For example, the PDMF I gave predicts (number of 1-2 $M_\odot$ stars) / (number of 1+ $M_\odot$) stars to be 95%, while it predicts the same ratio but for mass to be 90%. The figure you have has the fraction at 66%, more in line with the mass interpretation. I'm reluctant to make this an answer, though, without a source that extends the PDMF below 1 $M_\odot$.
Dec
13
comment Where did the energy released due to gravitational binding energy of the Earth go?
Not that this helps, but Wikipedia claims the binding energy is actually more like $2.5\times10^{32}\ \mathrm{J}$. (A centrally concentrated distribution will always be more bound than a uniform sphere.) I can confirm that I get the same answer numerically integrating the model given in the referenced paper.
Dec
13
comment Where did the energy released due to gravitational binding energy of the Earth go?
"the current internal energy contributes positive mass-energy to the Earth" -- sure, but since the rest-mass energy of Earth is over $5\times10^{41}\ \mathrm{J}$, I'd say this is pretty negligible.
Dec
13
comment Solar spectrum units
Something to ponder: what would the area under the curve represent in the two cases? (Hint: only one case makes any sense.)
Dec
13
comment Greiner or Landau for Math major student?
Are you looking to understand physical principles, or are you looking to have exposure to useful equations in physics? These are different things.
Dec
12
comment Would it be possible to “recycle” nuclear warheads into nuclear energy?
The world isn't powered by nuclear energy because (1) people are ignorantly afraid of the safest power source known to humanity, and (2) it's not overwhelmingly price competitive to operate nuclear plants as opposed to other plants. The availability of fuel has little to do with the politics and economics of the situation, especially since there's plenty of fuel that doesn't come from nation-states voluntarily surrendering their military investment.
Dec
12
comment How would night sky look like if the speed of light was infinite?
@pentane solid angle goes down as the square, which is what Tim S. surely meant.