27,768 reputation
459104
bio website
location Princeton, NJ
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 1 hour ago

I am a graduate student studying astrophysics at Princeton. I received my bachelor's in physics and mathematics from Caltech (2011).

My primary interest is in general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of black hole accretion.


Jun
24
reviewed Leave Open How to measure the diameter of a thin wire?
Jun
24
reviewed Close Are LC circuits preferred as series or parallel? Why?
Jun
24
reviewed Close Trying to derive compton scattering using 4-vectors
Jun
24
reviewed Close What is the null geodesic equation?
Jun
23
answered Why are stellar clusters useful for developing stellar evolution models?
Jun
23
revised Why are stellar clusters useful for developing stellar evolution models?
edited tags
Jun
23
comment How to derive the Schwarzschild radius?
I would actually argue that the event horizon is defined by the surface such that one can never escape from within to infinity. As it turns out, this matches the coordinate singularity in question, but it didn't have to. For example, the polar axis $\theta = 0,\pi$ is also a coordinate singularity in Schwarzschild coordinates, but it has nothing to do with the horizon.
Jun
20
comment Where do Maxwell's equations come from?
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/65335
Jun
20
reviewed Edit What's the point of looking at distances beyond $13,7$ billion light years?
Jun
20
revised What's the point of looking at distances beyond $13,7$ billion light years?
instead of comma please add decimal point
Jun
20
reviewed Approve textbook-erratum tag wiki excerpt
Jun
20
reviewed Reviewed How much energy is saved when using luggage with wheels?
Jun
20
reviewed No Action Needed Chemical potential of Cooper pairs
Jun
20
reviewed Close Deriving basic form of sine wave
Jun
20
reviewed Close What are the best open-access journals in physics?
Jun
19
comment Do we know what event caused the Sun and Solar System to form?
@AcidJazz The densest nebulae rival the best laboratory vacuums on Earth. As for the shockwave, clearly some stars (if nothing else the first star in the universe) formed without a supernova trigger, so it's more a matter of whether or not something gives gravity a shove in the right direction.
Jun
18
answered How does an object such as a galaxy split the image from a more distant galaxy into two images?
Jun
15
comment Why is the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) calculated like this?
Wow that's an awful wikipedia article. Just look at the formatting, the grammar, the unprofessional tone, not to mention the lack of capitalization of sentences. Probably better to delete the whole section than try to make sense of it.
Jun
15
comment Radioactive objects in a student's room
I guess as long as some sensible definition of "whole object" is understood it should be fine. Honestly, the answer is either "living tissue" or "the walls" if you include them depending on what the room is made of. To first order all living tissue is the same, the popular imagination's thoughts about bananas notwithstanding.
Jun
15
comment Radioactive objects in a student's room
I think the only thing wrong with this is using the metric "Bq/g" since then obviously the answer is a single stray atom of something highly unstable. Asking about dominant sources of radiation regardless of mass, however, is very important. As anyone who's ever worked in a radiation lab can tell you, the experimenter emits enough radiation to throw off numerous experiments.