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I am a graduate student studying astrophysics at Princeton. I received my bachelor's in physics and mathematics from Caltech (2011).


Oct
11
answered What could cause an asymmetric orbit in a symmetric potential?
Oct
11
revised What does the $c$ in $eV/c^2$ stand for?
forced line break to deal with overflowing text box
Oct
10
answered What does the $c$ in $eV/c^2$ stand for?
Oct
10
reviewed Close The electron: why can't it have both momentum and position
Oct
10
comment About category theory and physics
possible duplicate of Do Category Theory and/or Quantum Logic add value in physics?
Oct
10
comment Physics First: Where is Science Education Today?
@BenCrowell By "at the calculus level" I think I mean the same as you -- not necessarily knowing calculus, but comfortable enough with solving equations and having a feel for functions' behaviors that one could teach them calculus at that point. In my mind calc isn't a particularly high bar (no reason it needs to come after trig for example).
Oct
9
comment Physics First: Where is Science Education Today?
My HS teachers all agreed physics -> chem -> bio made sense pedagogically, but that this was in reverse order of the amount of math required. You can teach bio without anything, you need algebra for chem, and you really should be at the calculus level for physics. So unless you also forced middle schoolers to be proficient at pre-calc, it just couldn't happen.
Oct
9
comment What's the meaning when Kerr-Newman metric's mass is zero?
Are you trying to force charge and/or spin to be nonzero even as the mass vanishes? Because you're really only supposed to have $a^2 + Q^2 < M^2$.
Oct
8
comment Are the implications of an infinite universe necessarily so unsettling
@DavidHammen By using the index set $I$, one can avoid dealing with an infinite universe, merely an arbitrarily large finite one. The configuration space $S$ might be infinite, but I don't need a uniform distribution on it, just for $C$ to have positive measure. Or looking at $S$ modded out by "close-enough" indistinguishability, then $C$ can very well be one element of a finite set.
Oct
8
answered Does the commutator of anything with itself not vanish?
Oct
8
comment Does Coulomb's Law, with Gauss's Law, imply the existence of only three spatial dimensions?
No no no no no. Maxwell's equations are not fundamental. They are entirely derivable from Coulomb + SR. Since Gauss implies Coulomb, Maxwell + SR is a redundant set of axioms. One can argue over philosophical choices of minimal sets of axioms, but certainly one shouldn't be postulating axioms that logically imply one another. If you take Maxwell to be fundamental, you have to give up relativity as being universally fundamental.
Oct
8
answered How did Newton discover the universal law of gravitation?
Oct
8
revised How did Newton discover the universal law of gravitation?
edited tags
Oct
7
reviewed Close How long must a sample be irradiated before all 59-Co atoms are converted to 60-Co?
Oct
7
reviewed Close Computing things in Effective field theory
Oct
7
comment Are all machines linearly scalable?
Same question but for animals: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/72641/…
Oct
6
reviewed Close Determine eigeinvalue and eigenvector of two operators R and L
Oct
6
reviewed Leave Open How to find the function of acceleration respect to time while having the function of acceleration with respect to velocity
Oct
6
answered why do we use the equation we do for special relativity when there is a shorter, more intuitive one?
Oct
6
reviewed Reject suggested edit on why do we use the equation we do for special relativity when there is a shorter, more intuitive one?