18,437 reputation
44374
bio website
location Princeton, NJ
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen 11 mins ago

I am a graduate student studying astrophysics at Princeton. I received my bachelor's in physics and mathematics from Caltech (2011).


Aug
22
reviewed Leave Open Why the original BB84 paper “Quantum cryptography: Public key distribution and coin tossing” has 'withdrawn' status?
Aug
22
reviewed Leave Open Same number of independent parameters for $SO(n)$ and $O(n)$
Aug
22
reviewed Leave Open Alternate method of transmitting wireless electricity?
Aug
22
reviewed Close What does it take to build a low-drift load cell or strain gauge?
Aug
22
reviewed Leave Open Is there an equivalent to wetness for air?
Aug
22
comment Why doesn't the light from galaxies appear stretched?
This is a good question, but the big bang/inflation aspect is something of a confusing tangent. Galaxies had not formed by the time of recombination, and in fact most images of galaxies are from at most a few billion light years away.
Aug
21
revised Why is there a $\pi$ phase difference when light goes from a rarer medium to a denser medium?
fixed caps lock
Aug
20
reviewed Leave Open Collision between electron and proton?
Aug
20
reviewed Close Finding the work Done by Normal force?
Aug
20
comment Alcubierre drive and inertia.
Realize that you are asking for details regarding a physically impossible device. If you allow for the existence of a warp bubble, you may as well import anything else you desire from science fiction to help alter its properties.
Aug
15
comment How did Fizeau make his famous speed-of-light experiment?
Hopefully the laser came with some specs. Not just power output (btw you were lucky to get an actual high power one from amazon - most of the lasers online are many times worse than advertised) but also "beam divergence" or something similar. That could at least help in diagnosing why your particular setup didn't work.
Aug
15
comment How accurate are constants in cgs units?
I would think that for most major solar system bodies, $GM$ is known far better than $G$ or $M$, and this isn't going to change any time soon. The only non-$GM$ ways of getting mass I can think of are compositional inference and shoving the thing with a known force.
Aug
14
answered A common definition of a scalar
Aug
14
comment Wouldn't the presence of dark matter slow the expansion of the universe?
@allanemery be careful about jumping to hypotheses like that. The "dark" in both is a complete coincidence of naming. And moreover the ratio of dark matter to dark energy changes with the scale of the universe.
Aug
14
comment Why are cgs units the norm in astrophysics?
And this is why the IAU is a worthless organization. The audacity of professional bureaucrats to go up to scientists and say "these are the units you should be using." There may be reasons to prefer one unit system over another, but "we should go along with some long-dead French engineers because completely different fields do so" is definitely not one of them.
Aug
14
comment What is the physical meaning of commutators in quantum mechanics?
Maybe I'm underthinking this (certainly compared to the given answers), but exactly is wrong with "this expresses how much applying A then B is different from applying B then A"? Commutators of operators are important whenever operators don't commute. I suppose I realized this better when I learned about the commutator of covariant derivatives in GR (better known as the Riemann tensor of course).
Aug
14
awarded  general-relativity
Aug
13
comment Does extreme cold make **everything** extremely brittle?
Note that most things you see shattered in movies have lots of water in them, and we all know that ice tends to shatter. So, at least in principle, most movies can be sort of right even if other objects aren't so affected. In fact, answers should distinguish between "shattering because it turned into ice" and "shattering because it was a solid that became brittle."
Aug
13
comment Thermal superconductivity
In light of your characterization, would it be fair to say superconductivity is the prevention of gradients from building up, rather than the prevention of losses in flows? That is, it is only coincidental that nonzero electrical gradients imply nonzero ohmic losses?
Aug
13
answered Why does pitch in a helicopter take effect 90 degrees later?