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1d
reviewed Close Newton's Ring Experiment-The constant
1d
revised Light from Absolute 0
question has nothing to do with spacetime, black holes, or accretion disks
2d
comment The question of the protein and the ribosome
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is pure biology.
2d
reviewed Close How would you calculate consecutive bounces on a trampoline to find how much energy is lost each time or what percentage is lost each time?
2d
reviewed Leave Open energy efficiency - dryer vs hang+dehumidifer
2d
reviewed Close How the sun can burn that long?
2d
reviewed Close Geometric interpretation of zero metric
2d
reviewed Leave Open Is climate change caused by humans?
2d
reviewed Close Explain why the friction force and the component of weight down the plane are the same value
2d
reviewed Reopen Mass, velocity and inertia
Feb
5
reviewed Approve wigner-transform tag wiki excerpt
Feb
5
reviewed Reject Why does a salt solution conduct electrical current?
Feb
4
comment Cause for spikes in trinity bomb test
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/48127
Feb
4
comment Will the CMB eventually recede outside our observable universe?
@EmilioPisanty Yes, because there is space between galaxies, for any given galaxy we will eventually no longer receive updates from it. It's not so much that they will disappear, but rather their clocks will slow down from our perspective and they will get arbitrarily large redshifts, not unlike if the galaxy were falling into a black hole.
Feb
4
comment Will the CMB eventually recede outside our observable universe?
@EmilioPisanty It doesn't matter what the expansion history or future of the universe is. Your past light cone continues all the way to the Big Bang, and before it reaches there it passes through the emission of the CMB.
Feb
1
comment Where do astrophysical neutrinos come from?
@annav In fact, the acceleration mechanism for most high-energy protons is not pressure gradients in an explosion or anything, but rather Fermi acceleration across shocks, relying on electromagnetic interactions. Thus there are no analogous high-energy neutrons.
Feb
1
answered Are there any known negative heat capacities?
Feb
1
comment Are there any known negative heat capacities?
Are you set on materials, or would any system do?
Jan
31
comment Boeing 737 Homework Problem
It's good that you showed work, but that's not all: "It's not enough to just show your work and ask where you went wrong. If you just need someone to check your work, you can always seek out a friend, classmate, or teacher. As a rule of thumb, a good conceptual question should be useful even to someone who isn't looking at the problem you happen to be working on."
Jan
31
comment Cesium-137 From Fukushima Meltdown
This is really something a biologist should answer, the key term being "biological half life." Moreover, there's a concentration effect -- e.g. iodine is concentrated in the thyroid, but something like cesium isn't. In the end though, the answer is there is absolutely negligible radiation from Fukushima and it will never have a measurable effect on your health.