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location Princeton, NJ
age 25
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I am a graduate student studying astrophysics at Princeton. I received my bachelor's in physics and mathematics from Caltech (2011).


Jun
13
awarded  Informed
Jun
13
comment What is volume * mass be called?
It's hard to imagine this coming up very often, since it is the product of two different extrinsic quantities. If you really have a quadratic dependence on the amount of stuff, why not write it as an explicit square, normalized by whatever intrinsic quantity is needed: $m^2/\rho$?
Jun
13
reviewed Leave Open Integrable equations of motion
Jun
13
reviewed Approve suggested edit on dipole-moment tag wiki
Jun
13
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Reflections in a glass of water
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
13
comment Why do metal objects in microwaves spark?
Related: cooking.stackexchange.com/q/7830 Less related but more fun: cooking.stackexchange.com/q/7740
Jun
13
comment Relationships between different measure of opacity
Couldn't hurt to give a link to the paper. Non-paywalled or preprint versions preferable.
Jun
12
reviewed Reopen How is the energy of an electron-shell related to the speed of electrons in that shell?
Jun
12
reviewed Edit suggested edit on Wilson loops and gauge invariant operators (Part 2)
Jun
12
revised Wilson loops and gauge invariant operators (Part 2)
a latex symbol was lacking
Jun
12
reviewed Approve suggested edit on polarization tag wiki excerpt
Jun
12
reviewed Leave Open Triple-right triangle experiment: what's the minimum distance?
Jun
12
comment How to size an electromagnet
There are ambiguities, given that you can trade off e.g. shape and current (oftentimes one sees the cores have tapered ends to produce a locally very strong field). More importantly, you should understand that a mass is not a sufficient goal. Are you trying to attract a permanent magnet? a piece of iron? a piece of aluminum? How far away is it?
Jun
12
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How is a Hamiltonian constructed from a Lagrangian with a Legendre transform
Jun
12
revised Current to cancel Earth's magnetic field
made tex even better; minor punctuation
Jun
11
comment Aligning images of starfields
It's true that approximately 120% of professional astronomy data is reduced via IRAF, so +1. It's also true that IRAF is ancient and almost impossible to get working on any modern machine, never mind the learning curve associated with the least intuitive GUI ever written. If you already have Python installed, Pyraf is highly recommended instead. One can even get them together as part of the extremely large package of software known as Scisoft.
Jun
11
comment Is it possible to take a picture of a star?
@Gugg They are almost the same brightness in IR. And the image here looks resolved...ish... Certainly we can directly measure the angular diameter of R Doradus, as described in this article.
Jun
11
comment Is it possible to take a picture of a star?
The rays are indeed diffraction spikes. To my untrained eye they appear to be the result of support struts in the optical path (such as the case with Hubble), rather than polygonal aperturing. See physics.stackexchange.com/q/35935/10851
Jun
11
answered Is it possible to take a picture of a star?