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location Princeton, NJ
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I am a graduate student studying astrophysics at Princeton. I received my bachelor's in physics and mathematics from Caltech (2011).

My primary interest is in general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of black hole accretion.


Oct
10
comment Why can't Iron fusion occur in stars?
Related: What elements can be created in the fusion process of different types of suns? The full answer to this question, though, will need a good deal of stellar structure to explain.
Oct
10
comment The inner workings of the Olbers paradox
@Akash No, and the reason is more math than physics. If the universe is homogeneous (i.e. Earth isn't special), for every bit of light deflected away from us, an equal amount will be deflected toward us that otherwise would have gone elsewhere. Homogeneity begets a symmetry that allows you to assume every light ray travels on a straight line.
Oct
9
awarded  Deputy
Oct
9
reviewed Close What happens when a bacteria tumble? Is it an active or a passive process?
Oct
9
reviewed Leave Open Forces, Incline, and Mass
Oct
9
reviewed Leave Open Speed of approach between image and object
Oct
9
reviewed Leave Open Proof that Our Planet is 1D
Oct
9
reviewed Leave Open If I am travelling on a car at around 60 km/h, and I shine a light, does that mean that the light is travelling faster than the speed of light?
Oct
9
reviewed Leave Open Is matter a continuous part of the field of space-time?
Oct
9
reviewed Close What is bulk viscosity and how does it affect the flow?
Oct
9
comment A question once confused Confucius
In other words, the children are thinking logically but yet are both wrong.
Oct
8
comment Magnitude of New Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)
At least one claim has now been made that ISON is done for: arxiv.org/abs/1310.0552
Oct
8
comment When motion begins, do objects go through an infinite number of position derivatives?
Hi user92356, and welcome to Physics Stackexchange! The "soft-question" tag is really just for meta-level questions about physics (rather than any question that is "soft" in the generic sense); tags that convey the subject matter are better. I might suggest "classical-mechanics" for a start, but I don't want to make that change without your approval, as perhaps you wanted e.g. a quantum-mechanical viewpoint.
Oct
8
answered When motion begins, do objects go through an infinite number of position derivatives?
Oct
5
answered Will a telescope show a more magnified image if the object is brighter?
Oct
4
comment Temperature of thermochemical reaction between propane and nitrous oxide
Mols and enthalpies... this might get a better response at chemistry.stackexchange.com
Oct
4
comment Paper in physics - calculations; rounding or not?
Would you really always round uncertainties up? I can imagine that practice is meant to fight off the tendency for people to overestimate how "good" their precision is, but representing $1\sigma$ errors as $0.02$ rather than $0.012$ can be just as misleading, and in many cases would work in the author's favor ("our results are in statistical agreement with those of our previous paper...").
Oct
3
comment Isn't gravity non-local and non-causal?
@user6818 Nope. That's the equivalence principle (or the diagonalizability of the metric, if you like to think about it that way) for you.
Oct
3
comment Which cyan colored line is produced in the Thomson e/m apparatus?
Btw, that ping won't notify John Rennie. See meta.stackexchange.com/questions/43019/…
Oct
3
comment If I am travelling on a car at around 60 km/h, and I shine a light, does that mean that the light is travelling faster than the speed of light?
Waves - whether they are sound or light or water - are local phenomena, which means how the wave decides to move is determined by its immediate surroundings, not by whatever the source may have been doing far away. The speed of the source affects the frequency of the wave, but two waves of the same frequency in the same medium will move at the same speed, which for light in air is, as you said, a bit slower than $c$.