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location Princeton, NJ
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
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I am a graduate student studying astrophysics at Princeton. I received my bachelor's in physics and mathematics from Caltech (2011).


Jul
9
reviewed Leave Open Angles on swing sets
Jul
9
reviewed Close Electrons in a box
Jul
9
revised How do we know that these radio bursts are from billions of light-years away?
added acronym clarification; fixed typo
Jul
9
answered How do we know that these radio bursts are from billions of light-years away?
Jul
9
comment How do we know that these radio bursts are from billions of light-years away?
@dmckee On it :P (not a spectral feature in all likelihood)
Jul
9
comment How many stars did people think there were in the 11th century (or thereabouts)?
Request for clarification: 6000 stars within some DEC range (what is the southern limit)? or 6000 on a given night? or 6000 over the whole sphere (which I don't think you mean)?
Jul
9
revised How many stars did people think there were in the 11th century (or thereabouts)?
added more physics; removed observation tag (trying to keep that for modern instrument technique)
Jul
8
comment Why doesn't my house get misty?
Part of the explanation is an observer bias. You can't see fog except by looking through a lot of it, so unless your house is very large or the fog is extremely dense, you wouldn't be able to see much of it inside anyway. The rest of the physics is explained in the answers below.
Jul
8
comment Explaining lightyear to non technical people
Do you have a priori evidence that your audience is challenged on this issue? Don't underestimate the average person's ability to grasp ideas of "big" and "fast." (Or rather, don't overestimate how much scientists intuit such things. As an astronomer, my understanding of "light year" is nothing more than "the distance light, which is really fast, goes in a year.") Throwing a dozen different analogies at an audience is guaranteed to lose them.
Jul
8
comment A Cosmological horizon at the Hubble radius?
@Pulsar You beat me by a few seconds! I'll leave this cosmic expansion question to your expertise :) (For the record, I'm inclined to not say this is a duplicate, since there is a specific calculation here that can be addressed.)
Jul
8
comment A Cosmological horizon at the Hubble radius?
The Hubble sphere is not a horizon - see physics.stackexchange.com/q/41058/10851.
Jul
8
comment Organs & Oscillations: An Analysis on the Temperature Dynamics of Solids
For a sense of scale, if the pipe is tuned to A440 at $22^\circ\mathrm{C}$, then I believe the above formulas, neglecting thermal expansion, say it will play an A♯ at $56^\circ\mathrm{C}$.
Jul
8
comment Kinetic energy of a rotating rod
There are many variations on kinetic energy - rotational vs. linear, in particular. An integral will work, but this problem is far easier (assuming you can use certain basic formulas). If you know about integrals but not about rotational mechanics, then your curriculum does things the hard way.
Jul
7
comment Whether a battery store energy or simply it makes energy?
It's not so much that these are off-topic (well, (2) is about electronics/engineering, not physics). It's that you are asking three entirely unrelated, broad questions. This is not a forum, and it is certainly not Yahoo answers ;) Take a look at our about page - here, like all Stackexchange sites, we want to build up a collection of specific, well-posed questions that will be of help to future users (which also means that often the questions you have have already been answered if you search around).
Jul
7
comment Weyl Large Number Coincidence
So put another way, the age of the universe is $\approx \hbar^2/Gcm_\mathrm{p}^3$, which is constant. So would we even be asking this at any other point in the history (or future) of the universe?
Jul
7
revised Is it necessary to consume energy to perform computation?
changed title as per the upvoted comment suggesting so
Jul
7
awarded  Pundit
Jul
7
comment Is it necessary to consume energy to perform computation?
Suggested title change: "Is it necessary to consume energy to perform computation?" At the moment the title looks like you want to know how cooling fans work, but the body text is asking a much deeper physical question.
Jul
7
revised What is the geometry of our universe?
added tag; replaced pdf link with abstract link
Jul
7
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What happens to the wave function after applying the D'Alembert operator?