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location Canada
age 33
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen 2 days ago

Jul
11
comment formula for transparency of very thin film of metal
For a given wavelength, you need the complex permittivity or complex refractive index of aluminum and the refractive indices of the materials on either side of the aluminum film. (See refractiveindex.info). I'll post a more extensive explanation if I have time tomorrow and nobody else has yet.
Jun
21
awarded  Civic Duty
Jun
11
answered Make a semi transparent mirror with copper
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
May
25
comment What is a “Center Of Mass” issue of a Gorillapod?
I wrote a little essay about that a few years ago: ptomato.wordpress.com/2010/10/08/hurdles-even-here
May
25
comment What is a “Center Of Mass” issue of a Gorillapod?
@AnishaKaul: I'm sorry, I think we got off on the wrong foot here. I'm not trying to pick on you and I think your question is good. I'm not blaming you, because most people don't realize it, but that attitude comes across as aggressively insulting, at least to me (I don't know if I can speak for others.) I was trying to point that out in a light-hearted way, but I failed. Please don't let me discourage you from asking other questions, because we do enjoy explaining physics to non-physicists and believe it or not, we do try to avoid formulas when we are doing so ;-)
May
24
comment What is a “Center Of Mass” issue of a Gorillapod?
If you want physicists to help you, then perhaps you should think twice before calling their bread-and-butter "terrifying"...
May
23
comment Optics of the eye - do we see Fourier transforms?
I'd say "Given that a thin lens computes monochromatic FT, every thin lens, including our eyes, is 'computing' an infinite number of FT all the time. Just usually not the FT of anything useful and certainly not on the retina."
May
23
comment Optics of the eye - do we see Fourier transforms?
@RonMaimon, not sure what you mean by that last bit.
May
23
answered Optics of the eye - do we see Fourier transforms?
May
23
comment Optics of the eye - do we see Fourier transforms?
@RonMaimon, I never meant to imply that the lens image is a Fourier transform. It's not my statement and I agree with you that it's wrong. I'll write an answer explaining what I mean.
May
23
comment Optics of the eye - do we see Fourier transforms?
@RonMaimon: what? I think you're confusing classical optics and geometrical optics. Classical optics, the 'opposite' of quantum optics, is optics that can be explained without using photons. Specifically, to explain Fourier-transforming lenses, you need paraxial wave optics, which is firmly in the classical domain.
May
18
comment High school double lens optics question
Great example of how a homework question should be asked. The way your translated question is worded, one could also interpret it to mean that the convex lens is always at 65 cm in both cases. Unfortunately this also leads to 2 unknowns in 1 equation.
May
11
answered Effect of a wavefront deformation on the far-field diffraction pattern of a TEM00
Apr
29
answered What is the difference between Sapphire and BK7?
Apr
22
answered Light refraction and causality
Apr
20
comment Third-order susceptibilities of metals?
Optical frequencies - visible and near infrared (say 500-1000 nm wavelengths.)
Apr
19
asked Third-order susceptibilities of metals?
Apr
12
answered How long do reflections take?
Apr
12
awarded  Citizen Patrol