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visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Nov 23 '13 at 13:42

Jan
2
comment Nanorobots. What stops us from producing them yet?
@DavidZaslavsky : The reason why nanotechnology isn't widespread right now has more to do with constraints in production technology and economic viability than pure physics... I think if Dokkat changes the question to learning the theory behind nanotechnology then it would be on topic.
Jan
1
comment Power Generation from Axial and Transverse Emf
@AnamitraPalit : I like your thought process and I think you will immensely benefit from analysis. Economics dictate that the gains of any such system must be so immense that they must justify the cost of development, manufacturing and installation. In this world it would be much cheaper for the rail company to install a battery which is charged at stations than to implement such a system. Hence in order to create a system which disrupts what exists you need to provide a clear, tangible and significant benefit, and I think that with some thought you can do just that. :-)
Dec
31
comment Power Generation from Axial and Transverse Emf
@AnamitraPalit : It would actually be far more efficient if you focused your efforts on increasing the efficiency of the engine. As at the end of the day what you're simply doing is extracting energy from the engine, you might as well directly work on increasing the efficiency with which the engine converts one form of energy to another to extract work. I really do admire your sense of perspective, and I would encourage you to take a look at improving our current energy conversion systems.
Dec
31
comment Power Generation from Axial and Transverse Emf
@AnamitraPalit : As far as using something like this for capturing tidal power goes, then I agree that it is an intriguing thought, but it's trivially easy to add a moving plate between a large array of magnets, which is essentially what most such efforts do. After all, what is a dynamo, but an abstracted form of this plate? However everything comes back to efficiency & I wager that experimentation will find the conventional method is far more efficient than using the earth's magnetic field.
Mar
26
comment Going Beyond Introductory Physics
@anna v: I know it's possible to do it. My friend is a high school drop out who worked his way up, started a company, taught himself physics and computing and he's damn good (he put the web in web cam and transmitted live video over the web and NASA used this as a standard to broadcast the hubble mission to earth. Twice). I know this objectively because you'll have to fork up $3000+ a day for his analysis and solution. I also know that he is always busy. So, yes. It's possible to do amazing things outside an environment. It all depends on you.
Mar
26
comment Going Beyond Introductory Physics
It depends on the person and why they're learning. I suppose. You see, someone I know put it that if you take an extremely high IQ with determination. You can roll back the IQ a lot and still leave room for success. If you roll back determination then you get a perpetual grad student. I have no doubt that physics can be learnt outside an academic program. What I do have doubts over is whether I can do it. That's a different matter and that's my flaw. Not this.
Mar
25
comment Going Beyond Introductory Physics
@sb1: What do you mean?
Mar
25
comment Going Beyond Introductory Physics
I think that even very good physicists learn physics as a tool to satisfy something in them. Maybe you're right. I really hope that you're not, but maybe you are. Yet again the only way to find out is to go through this process. I've got decades ahead of me and I'm okay with the idea of making mistakes. Thank you for the answer though. :D -- A younger Anna
Mar
25
comment Going Beyond Introductory Physics
@Marek: Yes, that's it! Thank you.
Mar
25
comment Going Beyond Introductory Physics
@ Marek: Well I don't want to be an engineer. How can I explain this to you. I see things in a way that they are connected to one another, physics is just another way to look at it and that's why I want to learn it. I mean, do you think corona discharge is a very engineering-ish topic? But it's a part of a key insight that's allowing us to redesign fans and maybe create self cooling micro-processors someday. That's huge. scienceblog.com/15695/microchip-sized-fan-has-no-moving-parts
Mar
24
comment Going Beyond Introductory Physics
@Marek: You're right. It's too vast and that's partly why I asked the question, but I should have talked more about my interests and then asked people how to reach there. I'm interested in the experimental side of physics and creating physical things. A bit like engineering, except I would like to expand my horizons broader and understand things with greater depth. Does that help?
Mar
24
comment Going Beyond Introductory Physics
@Marek: Thermodynamics was just an illustration. The thing is that I'm simply not at the point of narrowing my field of study that much. What I want to invite is just what people think is a good start on a topic, how to develop the background for it and so on. Think of this as a survey course...
Mar
11
comment Are we crystals?
The interesting question is that can life exist in the form of crystals?
Mar
10
comment Calculate stainless steel pole necking limit
@Dave Jarvis: I'm sorry for not seeing that. I'll redo the calculations again and run it by you. That aside Sam's answer is much more thorough and better than mine so I think you should go with that instead, but for details sake I'll find out what I did wrong. Thank you.
Mar
10
comment Calculate stainless steel pole necking limit
@Sam Davies: I'm sorry I just derived the result and didn't type it out. It was my fault. As to why I didn't talk about buckling. Well, the truth is I didn't know that it was the accurate word for it. What do you suggest I should read? Most of what I know is essentially intuition and observation and I want to learn more.
Mar
9
comment Calculate stainless steel pole necking limit
@Dave: You did $g^2$ instead of just $g$. Wait do you have any more photos? Maybe we can figure something out without ruining your expensive desk. The best thing in my mind would be to perhaps stuff this poll with a smaller poll that just fits in there? Or maybe something like prestressed concrete (you know just pour concrete into the thing with someone's help and stand back, wait for it to cool)? So, that it's essentially a compressive force that you've got to worry about.
Jan
16
comment What Is Energy? Where did it come from?
As LM put it I was searching for potatoes only there are none to find.
Jan
16
comment What Is Energy? Where did it come from?
Thank you. For the explanation. It made my day.
Jan
16
comment What Is Energy? Where did it come from?
So, essentially, almost all of physics is based upon a quantity that no one has ever been able to truly define on it's own?
Jan
16
comment What Is Energy? Where did it come from?
Yep, I've studied that, but the thing you're overlooking is that what is this quantity? Think about it. Where does this capacity comes from? What allows us to exert a force in the first place? What is that unknown x?