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Dec
20
comment Effects of a non-Lorentz-invariant vacuum state
Thanks, @Nogueira . I'm not able to understand what you mean, can you elaborate on your point?
Dec
6
comment Definitions: 'locality' vs 'causality'
@ArnoldNeumaier Thanks for correcting the misspellings. Fundamental variables don't need to commute or anticommute at space-like distances in order for the theory to be causal, only observables have to commute.
Dec
6
revised Definitions: 'locality' vs 'causality'
misspellings
Dec
4
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Nov
20
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Nov
13
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Oct
23
comment When is quasiparticle same as elementary excitation, and when is not?
@Slaviks I'd say that you need to say (or hypothesize) what the fundamental constituents of the Poincare invariant medium are, so that you can establish a relation between the quasiparticles and the elementary degrees of freedom. There are people who think that way.
Oct
12
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Sep
16
comment To what extent is the Standard Model vacuum made of a Bose-Einstein condensate of Higgs bosons?
@MengCheng Before we go on, let's agree on definitions. To me, the property defining a Bose-Einstein condensate of bosons is the occupation of the ground state by a large number of particles. What property defines a BE condensate to you? Don't tell me Meissner or Josephon effect because BE condensation genuinely takes place in another systems such as dilute gases, where it was first experimentally encountered.
Sep
16
revised To what extent is the Standard Model vacuum made of a Bose-Einstein condensate of Higgs bosons?
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Sep
16
revised To what extent is the Standard Model vacuum made of a Bose-Einstein condensate of Higgs bosons?
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Sep
16
comment To what extent is the Standard Model vacuum made of a Bose-Einstein condensate of Higgs bosons?
@MengCheng Of course superconductivity was understood and discovered long before. I don't know how you could understand that from my question. But observing superconductivity, the Meissner effect or massive Z and W bosons doesn't imply observing the occupation of a ground state by a large number of particles. If you could elaborate it further, I could perhaps understand why you see these two phenomena as equivalents. I can see how the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate of Cooper pairs (Higgs bosons) """implies""" the Anderson-Higgs mechanism. But this doesn't make both things equivalent.
Sep
15
asked To what extent is the Standard Model vacuum made of a Bose-Einstein condensate of Higgs bosons?
Aug
31
revised Time ordering and time derivative in path integral formalism and operator formalism
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Aug
26
revised Definitions: 'locality' vs 'causality'
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Aug
26
revised Definitions: 'locality' vs 'causality'
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Aug
25
revised Schrodinger equation from Klein-Gordon?
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Aug
25
revised Can we apply Schrodinger equation in Newton Gravitational potential and derive the deterministic Newton's gravitation as a special case of it
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Aug
24
revised The divergence in QCD Series— How many are they, and what do they mean?
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Aug
21
revised Classical and quantum anomalies
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