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Diego Mazón


Aug
26
revised Definitions: 'locality' vs 'causality'
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Aug
26
revised Definitions: 'locality' vs 'causality'
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Aug
25
revised Schrodinger equation from Klein-Gordon?
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Aug
25
revised Can we apply Schrodinger equation in Newton Gravitational potential and derive the deterministic Newton's gravitation as a special case of it
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Aug
24
revised The divergence in QCD Series— How many are they, and what do they mean?
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Aug
21
revised Classical and quantum anomalies
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Aug
21
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
12
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Jun
18
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
16
comment Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?
@Void As I don't see where you confusion comes from, let try to help by saying that in non-relativistic quantum with an EM field, the charge density is just $\psi^*\,\psi$ and current density is the imaginary part of $\psi^*\vec D \psi$. The depends explicitly on $A$ for both bosons and fermions. It is this current, rather than that with non-covariant derivatives, the one that is gauge invariant. This expression with covariant will give a dependence on the kinematical motion of the particle.
Jun
16
comment Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?
@Void The canonical formalism doesn't cover up anything. It's everything clear and there isn't anything incompatible at all, 2) You just cannot put all temporal derivatives equal to zero, This is not a sensible physical limit as far as I can see. How do you justify that limit? It is a different dynamics rather than a limit. 3) I don't understand how that relate to this issue.
Jun
16
comment Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?
@Void 1) When you switch on the external homog electrostatic field, the dynamics of the matter fields $\phi$ change in such a way that they compensate the change in $A_0$. This is the gauge covariant version in configuration space (no canonical momentum). Another way to see it is fixing the temporal gauge, where there is no explicit dependence on $A$. So the external homog field is just $A_0=0$, $\vec A=\vec E_0 \, t$. Neither particles disappear nor their charge vanish. They just change their motion.
Jun
16
comment Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?
I have answered all your questions in full detail. What do you not understand?
Jun
15
revised Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?
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Jun
15
revised Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?
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Jun
12
revised Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?
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Jun
12
revised Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?
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Jun
12
answered Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?
Mar
21
awarded  Good Question