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Jan
14
comment Interpreting LED output distribution specification
@Garyp unless I misunderstand you, I disagree, because the light landing on the dome directly above the LED (zero degrees on the graph) is landing on a single point, whereas, at 90 degrees, that light would be falling across the full circumference of the dome? In a sense, an infinitely larger "area" (distance = area in this case, my calculus isn't good enough to explain, I hope it makes sense)
Jan
13
asked Interpreting LED output distribution specification
Nov
29
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
11
accepted How fast does heat travel via conduction?
Jun
11
comment Nothing can travel faster than the speed of the light, but could this be an exception?
But would it be theoretically possible, with an ultra advanced material?
Jun
11
asked How fast does heat travel via conduction?
Jun
11
asked Nothing can travel faster than the speed of the light, but could this be an exception?
Apr
15
awarded  Commentator
Apr
15
comment Closed-system power-generation using waterwheels
Around 1850 Rudolf Clausius and William Thomson (Kelvin) established the First Law of thermodynamics - that total energy is conserved
Apr
15
comment Closed-system power-generation using waterwheels
Using leverage you can do things like increase the speed/distance, at the cost of the amount of force, or vice-versa. Not both. There will still be energy lost, most of which would be as heat. Using the most rigid materials, and the best forms of lubrication or ball bearings etc would help, but nothing will be 100% efficient. Certainly not above 100%! Physicists have known this for a long time. It is the foundation of modern physics. Without this knowledge, we wouldn't have transistors, or car engines, we wouldn't even have had steam engines.
Apr
15
comment Closed-system power-generation using waterwheels
Impossible. It's like expecting a car's brakes to be able to use the energy to then accelerate the car again; it's not possible, which is why cars use fuel. You can re-use some of the energy, but not all. Certainly not create extra energy. In most conversions of energy, heat is the form of energy that inefficient processes lose it to. Your gears, electronics and the water itself would get warmer (from very slightly to significantly warmer)
Apr
15
comment Closed-system power-generation using waterwheels
To use the energy from flow of water to put the water back, with energy to spare, is creating energy from nothing. That is perpetual motion, which is impossible
Apr
15
comment Closed-system power-generation using waterwheels
Do you mean something which generates energy from nothing, basically?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
May
7
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
18
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
15
awarded  Tumbleweed
Nov
28
asked Air insulation cavity depth: rule of thumb to avoid convection
Nov
4
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
30
awarded  Quorum