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seen Jul 7 '13 at 22:47

Jan
9
comment Where does energy for high and low tides come from?
This is why we always see the same face of the moon: there are no longer tides on the moon. Tidal forces lead to friction, which locks the precessional and rotational rates.
Jan
9
comment Equation for the trajectory of a frisbee?
You've picked a very challenging problem. Once you acquire your data, could you please share it with us? I see several articles on this topic (biosport.ucdavis.edu/research-projects/…, web.mit.edu/womens-ult/www/smite/frisbee_physics.pdf), do any of them roughly cover what you are interested in?
Jan
9
answered What can $E=mc^2$ do?
Jan
5
revised What is the simplest possible topological Bloch function?
changed link
Jan
5
answered Non-commutative property of rotation
Jan
3
revised How many ways are there to distribute M excitations of N identical particles among K=3 quantum harmonic oscillators?
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Jan
2
awarded  Student
Jan
2
asked How many ways are there to distribute M excitations of N identical particles among K=3 quantum harmonic oscillators?
Jan
1
answered What is the simplest possible topological Bloch function?
Dec
31
comment What is the difference between a photon and a phonon?
@Slaviks, yes, I was just using a periodic crystal as an example of something that doesn't even have continuous translational symmetry. Air and liquids has no problem carrying sound.
Dec
31
revised What is the difference between a photon and a phonon?
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Dec
31
revised Why is quantum entanglement so important?
added 706 characters in body
Dec
31
answered Why is quantum entanglement so important?
Dec
31
answered What is the difference between a photon and a phonon?
Dec
27
answered What entities in Quantum Mechanics are known to be “not quantized”?
Dec
25
answered Identifying a critical phenomena?
Dec
23
answered Can entropy be equal to zero?
Dec
23
comment Can entropy be equal to zero?
I, for one, define temperature as $T = \partial U/\partial S$, so that a nonzero temperature always implies nonzero entropy.
Dec
23
comment Superposition of electromagnetic waves
I assume the question has a typo? Perhaps you mean: Is it possible to produce microwaves through the superposition of two optical beams? The answer is yes.
Dec
23
revised Superposition of electromagnetic waves
added 426 characters in body