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seen Jul 3 at 8:17

Jul
6
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
10
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
10
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
8
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
24
comment Magnetic fields and gravitational waves. How far do they reach?
The core point of this, is that he claims that an inisignificant action such as the current passing from the wire (from the batery) will have a side-effect which is "broadcasted" into a distance which is disproportionally larger than the action itself (just a small current from a battery). It seems correct in a "gross" way from your answer and of Cris
Dec
23
comment Magnetic fields and gravitational waves. How far do they reach?
Please see updated OP
Dec
23
comment Magnetic fields and gravitational waves. How far do they reach?
Please see updated OP
Dec
23
revised Magnetic fields and gravitational waves. How far do they reach?
added 790 characters in body
Dec
22
asked Magnetic fields and gravitational waves. How far do they reach?
Jul
4
accepted What is meant by “Nothing” in Physics/Quantum Mechanics(QM)?
Jul
3
comment What is meant by “Nothing” in Physics/Quantum Mechanics(QM)?
Fair enough.But I guess what you are saying here is that what the observation is, is that in time X there was nothing there and time X+δτ there is an apple.What I don't get is why it is believed that the apple appeared suddenly (and lost afterwards) and not that it was always there, but we couldn't detect it? Seems more reasonable to me that supporting that nothing is the "birth" of something.Does this make sense to you?I don't have your background and perhaps this seems to simplistic/dumb for you
Jul
3
accepted Naive question on quantum mechanics and uncertainty principle
Jul
3
comment What is meant by “Nothing” in Physics/Quantum Mechanics(QM)?
Interesting analogy.But where do this apple you add and eat come from?
Jun
29
comment Naive question on quantum mechanics and uncertainty principle
I think that it is counter-intuitive to someone like me, due to the way it uses terms like "nothing" etc which have a different meaning from what a beginner understands.
Jun
29
comment Naive question on quantum mechanics and uncertainty principle
@JohnRennie:Please forgive my simplicity in my question.It is due to the missing background
Jun
29
comment Naive question on quantum mechanics and uncertainty principle
@JohnRennie:Thanks for the update!I will bother you with one last question.You note that we assume that the vacuum is effectively nothing, because this assumption is consistent with experimental results that are based on theories which already assume vacuum as effectively nothing.But you seem to consider absurd the counter argument that there could be something there that we just haven't detected yet.But assuming that something is there (beyond us yet) leads to a model that is intuitive.But the current is counter-intuitive(or not?). Isn't it more reasonable to assume that reality is intuitive?
Jun
29
comment What is meant by “Nothing” in Physics/Quantum Mechanics(QM)?
a theoretical object is that the average value of a series of measurements of the field will be zero doesn't this depend on the scale?Perhaps it is because my lack of background but it seems to me that the term Nothing is a misnomer. It is actual a "handy" name for something so small that is negligible.But in reality there is "something"
Jun
29
comment Naive question on quantum mechanics and uncertainty principle
Thank you for the answer.I am not sure I get this:That means the energy of the vacuum must fluctuate i.e. energy must spring into existance from nothing Why MUST it be concluded that it sprung from "nothing" and not from a really low energy level (not-zero) which is steady at that level and is a starting point?
Jun
29
comment What is meant by “Nothing” in Physics/Quantum Mechanics(QM)?
A second point is that from "nothing" is generally taken to be the lowest energy state of a theory 1) Each "theory" has a different notion of "nothing" 2) lowest energy state is not the same as no energy state. Are these (2) also correct?
Jun
29
comment What is meant by “Nothing” in Physics/Quantum Mechanics(QM)?
So a first conclusion I make from a first reading of your answer (thank you for your help) is that what a physicist means when says Nothing does not have an exact equivalent with the term Nothing that we ordinary people use in our everyday speech.Did I get this part?