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What is a black hole? The word black hole is sometimes used in popular communications and speech to referred to different things. To event horizons and to singularities. When referring to singularity it usually refers to a singularity that can be reached in the future to contrast it with a white hole whose singularity can be in your past. However a ...


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A short answer is that frames themselves are moving towards the black hole and light moves relative to a frame and hence it can be stuck. Nothing passes through a black hole. Things can enter a black hole, they can't can't exit without going faster than light. Where do things go then? The important part of that question is the word "where" you ...


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In 1974 Stephen Hawking published a paper that provides a theoretical basis for the thesis that black holes eventually may radiate away all the mass, light, and other energy they accumulate. Evaporation of black holes has been called Hawking radiation. It takes place so slowly (at least until the black hole shrinks to a small size) that none has been ...


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Nothing special is happening! Think of a black hole as the accumulation of mass which is exceeding a certain limit. The same laws of gravity are applying before and after exceeding the limit. That means: Mass particles keep on being attracted. They are becoming part of the mass of the black hole. Electromagnetic waves will equally be attracted by the mass ...


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It is believed, according to our most tested theory of gravity (General Relativity), that objects, such as material from other stars, particles such as electrons and also photons of light, may actually pass through the Event Horizon of a black hole. For a large enough black hole, a person in a spaceship passing through the event horizon may not notice any ...


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No one knows what happens inside the black hole (I mean inside the event horizon). But inside the event horizon space becomes unidirectional (like time in real world) and therefore whatever enters into it must hit the singularity inside (at least according to classical general relativity). But again no one knows what happens at that singularity. By ...



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