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It seems to me that there is nothing fundamentally wrong about your statements, thus I also don't see any contradictions. The electroweak unification states that, as you said, the $Z$ and the $\gamma$ are different linear combinations of $B^0$ and $W^0$. This all works very nicely, there is just the problem of the masses which is then fixed my the Higgs ...


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Neutrons are only "ejected" if the nucleus is excited. One way to eject a neutron is by simply bumping them off. You could bombard nuclei with energetic particles that could transfer enough momentum to an individual neutron to dislodge it. So the "energy" used here comes from the momentum transfer. However, there's also "spontaneous" neutron emission. ...


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My answer to my own question here may be helpful. No, there is no anti-isospin as there is no anti-spin, because $SU(2)$ has no complex representations. In contrast, $SU(3)$ has complex representations and therefore the conjugate charge is different from normal charge, which means in the case of $SU(3)$ color A complex representation $R$, is a group ...


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Saying that $\textrm{SU}(2)$ describes internal symmetries as the isospin is somewhat incorrect. Rather, it is the gauge group describing the weak interaction. In quantum field theory the equations of motion for the fields and the particles involved therein are described by means of a Lagrangian which is supposed to be invariant under some gauge group of ...



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