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I have to take issue with Demosthene's textual analysis in a comment on the question. To examine the physics rather than the way chemists talk, we should look at a tree level Feynman diagram for the reactions. Any reaction. Both the reactants and the products touch the participate in a vertex with the force carrying boson, so both have an equal claim to be ...


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If certain reaction is allowed, the inverse reaction (if energy and momentum are conserved) will be allowed too. So neutrinos (not antineutrinos) can interact with neutrons to yield electrons and protons. For your second question: leptons can interact via electromagnetism, too. Electrons and positrons are leptons, and they interact mediated by photons: ...


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You're right that the reaction fails to conserve baryon number. The change in strangeness is a strike against the reaction, but not a fatal one; after all, the strange $K$ mesons decay into various mixtures of zero-strangeness mesons, charged leptons, and neutrinos. The thing to notice is that only the charged weak current, mediated by the $W$ boson, ...


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In the context of nuclear or particle physics the phrase "the strong interaction" means the same thing as "the strong force". In fact we rarely write a formula for the strong force in the sense that we write Coulombs law for the electrostatic force. Both terms are refering to the strong nuclear force. In the context of perturbation theory (or the lack of ...


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There are a number of issues with this question - it rests on false assumptions. The short answer is: No, we do not expect more forces to appear in any way. Yet, to say "the four forces used to be one force in the early universe" is overstating the knowledge we have. It is the basic idea of Grand Unified Theories to merge the three forces excluding gravity ...



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