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This is the plot of sunlight, red at ground level. Solar irradiance spectrum above atmosphere and at surface. Extreme UV and X-rays are produced (at left of wavelength range shown) but comprise very small amounts of the Sun's total output power. As all light comes from the sun during daylight this should suffice. One can get the number of photons by ...


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The answer to your question is no. Mixing a purplish (405 nm) and green (532 nm) laser does not produce a bluish beam at 468.5 nm. If you were to shine both lasers into your eye (which you should never do), the resultant effect would look bluish though due to the physiology of the human eye. However, it is possible to mix two wavelengths of light to ...


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Note You should never, ever look at a laser. It can cause irreversible damage to your eyes, including blindness. Now for your answer. Yes-ish It will appear to be something in between, as you can see from a color wheel. However, you should note that this would be the color you see if you reflected the beam off of something. It should be noted, however, ...


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Since no one else has mentioned it ... If you want to have a better conceptual understanding of the apparent slowing of light (and other electromagnetic waves) in materials, I strongly suggest reading Richard Feynman's lectures, especially Chapter 31 of volume I. That will give you much more explanation than is possible in this forum. All the Feynman ...


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Speed of light is constant in vacuum but different electromagnetic waves travel at different speeds in different media due to different refractive index.


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To my knowledge, there is no discretization of the light wavelength (they form a continuous spectrum). On the other hand, there exists no infinitely narrow absorption "potential". I mean that all transitions of electrons that may correspond to a photon absorption have a finite width. Consequently, the photons have a non-zero probability to get absorbed. ...


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As you can see the spectrum at the top of the atmosphere is continuous, with some saw tooth excesses, but still continuous. The absorption does create a saw tooth pattern, even so there is continuity. To dispel doubts here is the sun spectrum showing continuity and absorption spectra Solar spectrum with Fraunhofer lines as it appears visually. ...


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1 - The main reason is that your car RESEMBLES (not IS) a Faraday cage (even though, hey, we are talking about 10 meters - the smallest - wavelength here! The wave doesn't exactly "see" the car - it sees a material that is a mix of air, metal and silica). In the car there are also electronics that COULD also produce noise... But it wouldn't be the main ...


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The question "why does the wavelength affect diffraction", I think, could be best answered by looking at the two extreme cases. Assuming a narrow opening is illuminated: If the wavelength is much smaller than the width of a slit, wave effects can be completely ignored, because interference effects won't play a role. Consequently, the light waves will pass ...


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Since you don't have velocity information on the electron, then it doesn't have momentum, so any equation involving p can't be used. Just convert the electron's rest mass to energy directly, using E=mc²



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