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Imagine a billiard ball as it rolls on the flat billiard board in a straight line with constant velocity as expected. Then suddenly it changes direction. What happened? As you may think the billiard ball is not alone, there are other balls that collided with it. That's same situation with the wave function collapse. We are dealing with a partial system not ...


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Wave function collapse is not global, it is fictional. Let's suppose that the state is $\alpha|X=0\rangle+\beta|X=1\rangle$, where $|\alpha|^2+|\beta|^2=1$. When Alice measures the state, an operation is applied that correlates both Alice and the environment with the value of $X$, like so ...


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Here's how I understand your question: A and B are space-like separated and make a measurement on a single particle that has equal (or just non-vanishing) probabilities of being in A's or B's region. You now ponder how the measurement process works on a deeper level. Could the collapse be a dynamical (i.e. time dependent) process? I think it can not. If ...


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If we setup the camera to record like above but NEVER EVER EVER look at the result of what was recorded. Does the wave function still collapse? The answer is that we just don't know. We can tell that the wave function has collapsed (in Copenhagen terms) only when we humans look at the system -- in the canonical experiment that means looking at the ...



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