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Both are correct, actually. If you measure an observable for that wave function you'll either find the eigenvalue corresponding to state 1 with probability |c1|^2 (similarly for state 2), subject to the condition |c1|^2 + |c2|^2 = 1. Edit: What Griffiths is saying is that before you perform the measurement, the particle is neither in state 1 or 2, but in a ...


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The wave function you've provided is a linear superposition of two distinct energy eigenfunctions, $\psi_1(x)$ and $\psi_2(x)$, that are assumed to have distinct energy eigenvalues, $E_1$ and $E_2$ respectively. It is not possible to predict with absolute certainty the outcome of a measurement of the energy observable.


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The short answer is No. Because there is no definite energy state of this particle. It is in a superposition of two energy states $E_0$ and $E_1$.So, all we know is that any measurement will result in the collapse of wavefunction in one of the energy eigenstates. But where will it collapse is completely random. All we know is that there is equal probability ...


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The statement is correct. Let's be really specific. Is there a way to, in one measurement, determine whether you have: $$ | \psi_1 \rangle = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} \left( | 0 \rangle + | 1 \rangle \right) $$ or $$ | \psi_2 \rangle = | 1 \rangle $$ ? You should probably suspect that this is not possible. Whatever measurement you would get on the $| \psi_2 ...


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Your question has nothing to do with entanglement. You might as well ask this instead: Physics predicts that two positive charges will repel each other. Suppose I bring two positive charges into close proximity and find that they attract each other instead. How can this contradiction be resolved? Or you could posit any other experimental result that ...


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This is one of the most misunderstood things about entanglement, which is that it doesn't matter who goes first. Neither measurement actually affects the other one, contrary to the intuitive implications of "wave function collapse". Entanglement is correlation, not causation.


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Even if Alice and Bob are both first to measure their spin (according to their respective reference frames), two spins entangled into the singlet state will still give opposing results. That's what quantum mechanics predicts. Finding out that the entangled spins gave agreeing results would falsify a prediction of quantum mechanics. People would be very ...


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I am assuming the context is entanglement. In common language - The wave function does not collapse. Instead, the correlation of the wave function of the two entangled particles collapse. The wave function is such that the two particles are expected to give correlated outcome when measured. On the first measurement, the measured particle attains a different ...


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We don't know. To find out we would have to come up with a theory and an experiment to verify such a theory. Unfortunately while we aren't short on theories, we don't know how to test them experimentally.



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