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This is an excellent set of questions. The basic thing to realize here is that a wave function described by $Ae^{i(kx - \omega t)}$, where here $\omega \equiv E/\hbar = \hbar k^2 \ 2m$, extends with equal weight through all of the entire universe. These waves are called "plane waves". Because they are of infinite extent these wave functions are Not ...


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You will not easily find the second one because in a sense it is trivial. Here is the single slit and double slit pattern from wikipedia . If you try to detect which slit the particle went through you get two single slits except for some experiments that are very careful not to disturb too much the wave functions of the setup. If you go to a lab that ...


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The effect you are describing in your question is known as wave-particle duality and is a form of complementarity, it has been observed in various experiments. Realisations of Wheelers delayed choice thought experiment are what I find most interesting. In a delayed choice experiment the particles are not measured before they go through the slits but ...


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At least to me, it is unclear what it means to be "measured by the environment". As far as decoherence is concerned the situation is however quite clear. Already the original "einselection" framework of Zurek is applicable to bipartite system/environment scenarios. Let $(| p\rangle)_p$ be a "pointer basis" for the system. Then any Hamiltonian of the form ...


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As Hunter already remarked we can't say by no means that Quantum Mechanics is a complete theory, nevertheless a lot of experimental observations agree with QM predictions and on the other hand I don't think that there exists another theory which predicts so many phenomena in agreement with the experiments. (So that you may explain some "quantum" effects with ...


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I think the root of your question is that there is a misunderstanding of the concept of "observer" in quantum mechanics. If the ball is observed on this side of the wall, the probablity that it will later be observed on the other side of the wll is so small that it is essentially zero (because the ball is a macroscopic object.) Now, what does it mean to ...



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