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To answer this one by one, as it has to some extend been in the comments: 1.) Gravitational waves have all the usual properties that classical waves have. E.g. they can interfere etc. 2.) General relativity, the theory in which grav. waves are described, is a classical field theory. In that sense, grav. waves are a classical phenomenon. At the moment, ...


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The very word, photon, belongs to the quantum mechanical regime. It is one of the elementary particles in the standard model of particle physics. Elementary particles are described with quantum mechanical wave functions, which are complex function. The complex conjugate square gives the probability of finding the particle at (x,y,z,t). In the case of the ...


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It has to do with the total energy or power of the EM wave you're interested in, as well as the frequency of the wave. As a simple example, a 3mW laser at 500nm wavelength will produce roughly 7.55*10^15 photons per second. From how large this number is, it's not difficult to see how light will usually be made up of an extremely large number of photons. For ...


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In quantum mechanical domain these type of question does not have meaning. Every single photon is associated with a wave and vice versa. But to talk whether an electromagnetic wave contains a single photon or not is an ambiguous statement. When people say an electromagnetic wave necessarily contains many photons it only means that a incident beam of ...


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Particles are simply high momentum wave states interacting weakly with matter, i.e. their "existence" is observer dependent. Trying to derive them from some form of free field equation is therefor useless and so is the assumption that they are a general phenomenon. They are a highly likely phenomenon for energies that are much higher than the typical em ...


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You are very close. First consider how the different lights colors interact with each other, please see additive color for an explanation. Then if you consider a double slit experiment as shown on wikipedia with coherent monochromatic light. Now we know that sunlight is composed by continium of wavelength of slightly different colors, but you can think of ...


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It is possible that the wavelike behavior in a double slit experiment is just the outcome of particle distribution. One example is on my link at the top of my page. No one has ever offered any justification as to why particles can be proven wrong and waves can be proven right. No one can even explain how a wave without a medium can work. On the other hand ...


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The nearest possible analogy to a Galton board will be a quantised electric field, interacting between the electric fields of surface electrons from the edges of a slit and the electric field of the particle (an electron or a photon), one direct to the slit. A common field would explain even the longtime distribution pattern from single shoted particles and ...


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It cannot be proven, because "wave-particle duality" is not a mathematical statement. It most definitely is not "logically true". Can you try to make it mathematical? A mathematical framework The "complementarity principle" was introduced in order to better understand some features of quantum mechanics in the early days. The problem is that if you consider ...


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For two particles to influence each other you need some sort of interaction. For (macroscopic) mass this is clearly Coulomb-interaction. Two atoms can not be at the same place, because their cores repell each other. If you look at smaller scales, strong and weak interaction might add their part. Photons have no charge, no color-charge and don't interact ...


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The following quote is relevant to whether in quantum mechanical terms there exists a monochromaticity possible , i.e. exact knowledge of momentum for the photon: instead of a slit, there is an electron. So the problem "photon impinging on slit" is a quantum mechanical problem, and there exists an uncertainty on the momentum of the impinging photon from ...


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There's not necessarily uncertainty in the wavelength of the particle. The magnitude of the momentum vector could be the same for every particle, but its direction could be different. The particle's speed is certain, but the direction it heads in is not. In real light and particle sources, however, there is always uncertainty in the wavelength. Even lasers ...


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Diffraction can also occurr around abstruction . Suppose u put ur finger infront of light w.front such that ur fingers shadow will appear on the screen placed behind ur finger . When light w.front strikes ur finger then the light ray at the upper and lower extremes of obstruction will bend and enter in to shadow region generated by the obstruction and in ...


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In this experiment a changeable detection is designed Overall, the results suggest that the type of scattering an electron undergoes determines the mark it leaves on the back wall, and that a detector at one of the slits can change the type of scattering. The physicists concluded that, while elastically scattered electrons can cause an interference ...


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No. The strange behavior of the photons is directly related to the observation of which slit the photon passes through. Once it is no longer an observer, and by observer we mean that we detect the presence of a photon, the results change. The original experiment kept the detector in place and simply did not activate it, so it would have had the same ...



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