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2

The white cloud you see in the water is steam bubbles. The grains of salt provide nucleation sites that allow the water to vaporize as they fall through the superheated liquid (so BowlOfRed had it right--although it's steam that is forming, not dissolved gasses coming out of solution). If you raise a pot of water to near boiling and toss in a handful of ...


3

Maximize the thermal contact between the heat source and the water Minimize the thermal contact between the pot and the environment Avoid (or recapture) evaporation (put a lid on it) Of course if you want to cook food quickly, you need a pressure cooker (temperature of water goes above 100 C and you get significant increase in cooking speed as the ...


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I take your question as Is there any substance with condensed (solid or liquid) equilibrium phase at zero pressure? No, because of statistical physics. Let's consider two things. (1) The potential energy of interaction between molecules. (2) The thermal energy distribution for molecules. The potential energy of interaction can generally be of any ...


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The boiling point of liquids depends on temperature and pressure. If the pressure of the medium that the liquid presents increases, the boiling point of the liquid increases as well. Since perfect vacuum has no pressure, all liquids boil in a perfect vacuum. However, there is no such a thing as perfect vacuum(even space is %99.99 vacuum). If you are asking ...


0

Well - air does have "relative humidity" and this really affects the things that interact with it. For example - you will have a hard time cooling down by sweating when the relative humidity is very high, as the rate of evaporation that you can achieve (and therefore heat rejection) becomes quite low: this is why you end up "sweaty" on a hot muggy day. ...


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Ion drag is associated with low frequency (RF) EM waveforms, and is what causes resistive heating, not dielectric heating. Dielectric heating (e.g. microwaves) relies on dipole rotation.


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Interesting question. I suppose one should compare several scenarios Lie still Go forward - either straight, or hard to port, or hard to starboard Go in reverse The rate at which water enters the ship is (to first order) proportional to the pressure differential - lower the pressure and live longer. Maybe even long enough for the Carpathia to come and ...


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The following picture (from http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/waves/imgwav/circonwave.gif) gives you a better sense of how to reconcile your observation with "circular motion": As you can see - there is circular motion for particles at the surface: they don't have to go under water to do it though. Incidentally this also shows that in the trough ...



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