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11

Quite simply, no. Water memory doesn't appear to violate any physical laws, and the claims made about it are not well-defined or specific enough to be falsified (e.g. with an entropic argument). It's revealing that while a scientist could be convinced that he's wrong, there's nothing that could change the mind of a homeopath. The best we can do is test the ...


5

Can this frozen form freeze further? Or can it become more solid? (for example, by exposing to colder temperatures and/or a higher pressure). Can ice freeze further by transforming into a different crystalline form? The ice will remain solid while lowering temperature or pressure but might change in state, or phase, as you mention. But you should ...


3

Think of a pressure cooker... The higher the pressure, the higher the boiling temperature. You need a vessel that will hold the pressure at 350C. Wikipedia gives a formula for the pressure need to get the boiling temperature of water up to a certain value. The formula is $$T_b=1730.53/(8.07131-\log_{10}P) -233.426$$ where $T_b$ is the boiling temperature ...


3

This is because the whole boat, along with the air in the boat, is lighter than the water it displaces. For example, if a small boat will take up 1 cubic meter of water, then it has to be heavier than the weight of 1 cubic meter of water. This is explained in this post by What If here. For the same reason that bowling balls float (because salt water the ...


2

So, this is an old post that I came across when I had a similar question. Here's a paper where they dissolve different amounts of ions in the water and found that the ability for the microwave oven to heat the water actually reduces as more ions are introduced.


1

Two factors: Overall density. A boat isn't only metal. It contains copious amounts of plastics and wood, which have lower densities than water. You have to calculate the overall density of the object, not just the metal. Shape: If boats were made in a sink-friendly shape, they would certainly sink (regardless of wood and all). Engineers design boats to be ...


1

Removing humidity from air requires cooling it to the point of condensation, then removing the latent heat of evaporation so it actually condenses. Ice, on the other hand, will remain at 0°C as you add heat, until it melts. So it's convenient to estimate the ability to remove moisture from the air in terms of the amount of ice it would take. Latent heat of ...



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