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In my experience, in brushes the strongest force acting on the water is the capillary force due to the surface tension in the liquid and the proximity of the hairs in the brush. Surface tension will cause the water to try to "wet" as much of the brush hair as possible - regardless of orientation. If there is excess water, such water will be pulled down by ...


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I think it is partially a perceptional problem. The pressure, i.e. force per area is depdendend on the depth of water in this case, and it doesn't matter much, if you are naked or if you wear waders. But if you wear waders, the pressure is implied on the surface of your clothes, not on your skin. Your clothes will now dent to give in to the pressure, until ...


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You could think of this in terms equilibrium processes. The shower increases the partial pressure of water in air and that pushes the equilibrium of water condensing on the surface in the forward. There may also be some capillary action if the adsorbed water can form small liquid droplets. As more water seeps into the tissue the stress-strain properties of ...


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The speaker causes the hose to vibrate, shaking it 24 times a second. To the naked eye this looks like something of a blur, but if your camera is also taking a shot every 24 seconds the video looks like the water is frozen in space, with just slight changes to the position of the drops. Adjust the frequency up slightly and the water appears to be falling ...


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It seems to me this would work only if the cup to which you transfer water is lower than the source cup. The experiment you describe would not work. Capillary action is the result of adhesion, cohesion, and surface tension. If water molecules are attracted via intermolecular bonds to another material with which they have an affinity even greater than the ...


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Water, like most liquids does indeed get more viscous as its temperature approaches freezing point. See the graph below, which I took from the "Engineering Toolbox" However, what's interesting about this curve is that it does not diverge as $T\to 0^\circ{\rm C}$. The reason is that a phase change really is for all effective purposes a discontinuous ...


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Here is an interesting article that shows how water was frozen at high temperature under pressure http://www.azom.com/news.aspx?newsID=8016 Here is an extract Sandia Convert Water to Ice in Nanoseconds Published on March 19, 2007 at 1:15 AM Sandia’s huge Z machine, which generates temperatures hotter than the sun, has turned water to ice in nanoseconds. ...


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When high pressure is applying on a gas, it gets converted into liquid form. Similarly, if more pressure is applied to the liquid, force of attraction increases so that the liquid is converts into solid state. As the pressure increases the rate of crystallization also increases. i.e., the freezing point also increases.


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Capillary action. In simple terms, water really likes to wet certain surfaces (e.g. your paper towel fibers), and is willing to do so against a small amount of gravity. If you have lots of wettable surface area per volume of water, then the water can be pulled up quite a distance.


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Assuming the hose length is the same, and ignoring any restrictions caused by bends in the hose, you want as great a gravity and pressure difference as possible to pull the liquid through. If you have the hose end at the top of the destination container, with the liquid falling down to the level of the already-moved liquid, then you aren't getting as much ...


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You can't measure speed over the ground when you are moving in a boat unless you carefully observe nearby shore objects and measure your progress with a timepiece, or unless you have an instrument that measures speed against the bottom of the lake. It's quite likely that you saw wind waves washing past you, and attributed their apparent speed to your boat's ...


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First, you can have currents caused by something else that are pushing you one way while the wind is blowing the other. Second, as the other answer says, the ripples from the wind can be deceiving. Far from the shore, it's difficult to get a sense of speed relative to trees or docks. And the ripples on the surface don't always extend into the water itself ...



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