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Each branch containing resistors acts as a potential divider, dividing the voltage across the whole branch in the ratios 40:50 and 50:40 (top and bottom respectively), ie the ratios 4:5 and 5:4. This means that each resistor will have either 4/(4+5)=4/9 or 5/(4+5) = 5/9 of the total voltage (18V), which as you have correctly calculated is 8V for both the ...


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There are two possible factors that are involved here: The plasma emits electromagnetic waves, which means there will be an oscillating electromagnetic field spreading around the plasma ball, which would explain why the voltage detector beeps 3 feet away. In fact, it is an interesting experiment to study the electromagnetic waves propagating from the ...


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A battery works by making charge want to move from one terminal to the other (we call this a potential difference, or voltage). The charge is also moving through the inside of the battery itself (the electrolyte). When you hook up a wire to an anode and cathode of two different batteries, the buildup of charge on the anode of the first battery quickly ...


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A battery is no capacitor, and the actual charge stored in the battery terminals is very low. When you connect the anode of one battery to the cathode of another, that charge is transferred very quickly, and the voltage drops to zero. When you connect anode and cathode of the same battery, a chemical reaction takes place, and charges flow inside the battery ...


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If we double the voltage in a circuit then what will happen to the power? Even for a simple circuit composed of a voltage source and other passive circuit elements, you have not provided enough information to give an answer. Assuming you mean "double the voltage of the voltage source", one must specify what happens to the current in order to answer ...


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In a basic circuit, including just resistances and a power source, and no capacitors/inductors, then if you double the voltage you should quadruple the power. This is because doubling the voltage will double the current as well (through Ohm's law, V=IR) which means that the power dissipated, P=IV=(V/R)*V = V^2/R, that is P is proportional to V^2.


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I'm still in Physics A, and Mechatronics 1, but we have gone over this in class. (So i'm still learning myself. I may be wrong.) By "Power" i'll assume you mean wattage. "Power" is equal to voltage multiplied by amperage. P = I*E If we have 1 amp and 12 volts than we have 12 watts. Doubling the voltage would give us 24 watts. It's the same if we have ...


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When the voltage is high enough so that the speed becomes relativistic, two effects precludes becoming superluminal. First you must now use the relativistic form of newton's second law, with 4-vector velocity and acceleration. Second you must keep in mind that an accelerating charged particle would radiate with a power proportional to the square of its ...


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To basically summarize and re-organize the linked-to answers: 1) When a charge $q$ is moving (say at velocity v) through a perfect conductor such as an ideal wire, it requires no force to maintain its velocity because it encounters no resistance. This is good, since there can be no electric field inside a perfect conduct and thus no force can be applied to ...


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As I understand your question, you have a set of 5 'good' sources in series. You also have 4 'good' sources and 1 source that starts out 'good' but turns into an infinite resistor, which are in series. You connect the two sets in parallel, and then measure the open-circuit voltage between the two ends. The short answer is that nothing would happen to the ...


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You present both a static and a quasi-static case here. Let's consider them one at a time: 1) Static case: You applied a large potential to the screw relative to ground, which charged the screw. The firebrick is a good insulator, but not perfect, so the charge on the screw should polarize the material slightly, creating a slight electric field inside the ...


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I am not really sure what equalize surface charges means, but yes, charge gets redistributed and shared in this new part of the circuit as there will be a new equilibrium potential in between the two original values in the seperated systems. Remember though that their potential must be measured with the same reference (or else you could not know if one was ...



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