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Physicists have a slightly different (and in my opinion incorrect) way of deriving nodal circuit diagrams than engineers, which would make his statement correct because the circuit diagram would imply that the wires form loops of a finite area, but this way of thinking breaks the usefulness of circuit diagrams in fundamentally undesirable ways. If you ...


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OK, in this video you've kindly provided me, Lewin essentially talks about this circuit: The easy rule of thumb that's common to all electrical engineers is to say: a current $I$ goes through this loop, causing a voltage drop $R I$ across the resistor, a voltage drop $\int_0^t dt~I(t)/C$ across the capacitor (assuming it is uncharged at $t=0$), and a ...


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The current in a circuit is a collective phenomenon from zillions of electrons. It appears due to conductivity, another collective phenomenon . It is a cumulative behavior of atoms and electrons in matter. In insulators, electrons occupy energy levels and have to be actively kicked out of them, with the energy provided by an interaction. Insulators can be ...


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Assuming the bulb emits in the visible wavelength regime, then you can use a silicon photodiode. Depending upon the particulars of your "bulb" you could put the photodiode in series with a resistor and put that combination in parallel with the bulb. So as the photodiode receives more light, it's resistance will decrease thereby allowing current to flow in ...


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You seem to be asking, "what happens to an electron when its voltage changes?" In short, nothing happens. An electron has no idea what voltage it's at. You claim this is different from an object's height, but it's actually exactly the same. If you only look at an object, by itself, you'll have no idea what height it's at. Nothing about the object changes ...



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