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As far as the second part of your question is concerned you can directly see the image improvement with squinting. If you have a DSLR with aperture settings you keep the camera slightly defocused and now reduce the aperture you will see that the image is becoming sharper. However at the same time the image will become darker because you are collecting less ...


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EDIT Please see the comments following my answer, regarding the paragraph below , as it is incorrect. Strabismus is the clinical name for squinting. The squint is simply compression of the eye muscles to compensate for problems with focusing and / or astigmatism. END EDIT In a somewhat similiar way, telescopes using adaptive optics can distort the ...


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From a recent paper, Direct detection of a single photon by humans. JN Tinsley et al. Nature Comms 7, 12172 (2016) (open access). Abstract: [...] Here we report that humans can detect a single-photon incident on the cornea with a probability significantly above chance. This was achieved by implementing a combination of a psychophysics procedure ...


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I think your question is about the perception of colour - ie how your brain responds to the mixture of light which stimulates the retina. This cannot be explained by the superposition of waves using Maxwell's equations. It is more a matter of physiology (biology) than physics [1]. Colour is not a property of the physical world. It is our subjective ...


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The light waves propagate directly and the flux of photons reduces at a rate of 1/r^2 from the canopy top. This means that fewer of the photons reach your retina or CCD of a camera while in orbit. It seems to be a more uniform color of green simply because that is the majority wavelength being reflected by the plants. As knzhou pointed out, light is ...


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Assume you are looking with just one eye (in order to isolate perspective from stereo vision effects), and choose any Euclidean coordinate system that has your eye at the origin. The light emitted from any point on a given straight line will fall onto your retina at essentially the same position, i.e. straight lines through your eye are collapsed onto a ...



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