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Space and time are features of the matter, not the matter itself. For instance, energy is another feature of the matter. If matter can be created or destroyed it's another question, the energy is said to be conserved (but, virtual particles?!). Though, matter comes with its features.


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Maybe what you are looking for then, is the Casimir effect?? Here, the energy in a vacuum between two plates produces a force between them.


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You are probably referring to the phenomenon where pairs of particles can appear and disappear randomly inside a vacuum. Such a situation where energy is then extracted from these pairs can occur, for example, at the edge of a black hole, where a matter and antimatter pair would be created. The antimatter would go into the black hole, while the matter flies ...


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Sorry for being oxymoronic here, but your questions (OP) are in their very meaning, illogical. I mean to say that you have used extremely misleading terminology to present your question. I am unable to understand what exactly you intend to ask. Why is space a vacuum? Space is a vacuum because the word vacuum means "empty space". If the universe had no ...


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Space is sometimes described as a vacuum better than mankind could create in any laboratory. But it is not a vacuum, but a tenuous plasma carrying the interplanetary medium (solar wind). It is also structured, forming the Heliospheric current sheet. This means that space has the characteristics of a plasma. It is electrically conductive, carries magnetic ...


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Why is space a vacuum ? Because, given enough time, gravity tends to make matter clump together. Events like supernovae that spread it out again are relatively rare. Also space is big. Maybe someone could calculate the density if visible matter were evenly distributed in visible space. I imagine it would be pretty thin. (Later) Space is big. Really ...


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First, space is not a complete vacuum. You still have some particles going around in there. In common mind, space is empty, but it is only "empty" because you have some massive particles in it (like planets, stars etc.). Around these particles you have a strong gravity field (of course in the other, "empty" regions you have that too, but only very weak ...


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A simple (and quite accurate) answer is that quantum fluctuations are the fluctuations that exist at zero temperature. What it means is that even at zero temperature, there might be fluctuations in the measurements of observables, which does not happen for classical systems at zero temperature, due to the non-commutativity of the dynamical and potential ...


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As far as I know, the number of points to not have any influence on divergent behaviour. The infinite vacuum energy comes from the fact that we allow arbitrary frequencies for our quantum fields. There is no difference if we sum or integrate a constant from zero to infinity, the result is still infinite. $$\sum_{k=0}^\infty {1\over 2} \sqrt{k^2+m^2} ...


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Virtual particles are far more plausible because of experimental results such as the Casimir Effect which is non classical and predicted as a consequence of the "reality" of virtual particles.


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Check synchrotron radiation in the wiki article. When high-energy particles are in rapid motion, including electrons forced to travel in a curved path by a magnetic field, synchrotron radiation is produced. bold mine. Charges when accelerated radiate electromagnetic radiation, and the curved paths in the synchrotron give a continuous angular ...


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An air bubble in water expands until its internal pressure matches the external pressure in the water around it. The bubble moves upwards, however, because the air is less dense; water immediately above the bubble is pulled downward by gravity more strongly than the air in the bubble is being pulled downward. This difference means that the water flows ...


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Particles do not constantly appear out of nothing and disappear shortly after that. This is simply a picture that emerged from taking Feynman diagrams literally. Calculating the energy of the ground state of the field, i.e. the vacuum, involves calculating its so-called vacuum expectation value. In perturbation theory, you achieve this by adding up Feynman ...


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Technically, little vacuume can carry huge wight even with little air flow. For example typical vacuum cleaner can lift column of water 2 m high other dimensions will go together with the vacuum surface. This means that it can carry some 80 cm column high of concrete or 25 cm column high of steel, assuming it is perfectly sealed. If not perfictly sealed such ...


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The commonly accepted interpretation of Special Relativity is that it's impossible to determine an (inertial) frame of references absolute motion (by performing experiments within that frame). So the default answer (given what we know) would be no, you can't determine your absolute motion relative to the background sea of virtual particles. However this ...


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Your argument against is based on the fact that in one frame there is no magnetic field in one frame, but there is a magnetic field in a different frame. So there must be magnetic virtual particles in some frames but not in others. Hence magnetic virtual particles can't exist. However there aren't separate magnetic and electric virtual particles. There are ...



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