New answers tagged

1

There are two mistakes. As AccidentalFourierTransform pointed out, the coefficient $7.181\times 10^{-16}$, when converted from MeV to eV, should give $7.181\times 10^{-46}$. Mega means a million, and it to the fifth power gives $10^{30}$, not just $10^{15}$. In this way, the OP has to add a $10^{-15}$ factor to his result. That makes his result $10^{-3}$ ...


0

In answer to your question, for the general purposes of plasma physics, $k_b$ is defined in $eV/K$, or electron volts per kelvin. You will sometimes see reference to the electron temperature being in units of $eV$ rather than $K$, but this is a simplified way of writing the temperature to deal with scales on the order of 10^4 $K$. In other words, it is ...


1

Suppose you take a circle of radius $\ell$ and take an arc of length $\ell$ along the circumference, then 1 radian is the angle subtended by the arc: More generally, if the length of the arc is $\ell$ and the radius of the circle is $r$ then the angle in radians subtended by the arc is $\ell/r$. So the radian is a derived unit because it is the ratio of ...


0

http://www.britannica.com/science/electromagnetic-unit-of-charge electric charge Electric charge ...× 10−19 coulomb. In the centimetre–gram–second system there are two units of electric charge: the electrostatic unit of charge, esu, or statcoulomb; and the electromagnetic unit of charge, emu, or abcoulomb. One coulomb of electric charge equals about ...



Top 50 recent answers are included