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6

This is a relatively tricky one, because it involves the differences between the $\mathbf B$ field and the $\mathbf H$ field in the SI and CGS systems, and those relationships change in the different systems. In short: Oersteds are used to measure the $\mathbf H$ field in CGS units. Teslas are used to measure the $\mathbf B$ field in SI units. In the SI ...


9

They are technically units for incommensurate quantities, but in practice this is often just a technicality. The magnetic field that makes sense ($B$) is measured in teslas (SI) or gauss (CGS), and the magnetic field that people spoke about 100 years ago ($H$) is measured in amps per meter (SI, also equivalent to a number of other things) or oersteds (CGS). ...


4

From a quick google search, it seems that Oersteds are used for defining magnetic field strength and Teslas are used for defining magnetic field strength in terms of flux density. They seem to not really be meant to be converted between, though you technically can (as evidenced by the other answers here). This website and this website might be helpful to ...


0

Quoting from the Wikipedia page on the CGS system: The e.s.u of charge, also called the franklin or statcoulomb, is the charge such that two equal $q=1\:\mathrm{statC}$ charges at a distance of $1\:\mathrm{cm}$ from each other exert an electrostatic force of $1\:\mathrm{dyn}$ on each other. The e.m.u. of current, also called the biot or abampere, is the ...


2

If I have a raw xrd data then how should I convert my peaks arbitray unit intensity to percentage? In olden days visual intensity scale was used by us in the interpretation of single crystal diffraction data. As the relative intensities were a requirement the laboratory standards were set on the 'reference' diffraction photographs available say of ...



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