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In the situation you gave, it's immediately clear what is meant, and there's no possibility for misinterpretation, so yes, it's perfectly acceptable. (Remember that torque is mathematically defined as a vector for convenience, but the direction of that vector isn't really physical.) The only issue I can see with that is that as you leave the simple ...


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The problem is in assuming the force is forwards at a contact point right underneath the axis of the wheel, together with the no-slip condition. This leads to zero friction force, since their is no friction when their is no slipping. A solution can only be found when deformation of the wheel is taken into account, allowing the force to act on a different ...


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Check ✓ except the the speed depends on the center of rotation, not the choice of the origin. The general rule is that if the origin as velocity $\vec{v}_O$ then a point A located at $\vec{r}_A$ has speed $\vec{v}_A = \vec{v}_O + \vec\omega \times \vec{r}_A$. It happenstance that your origin does not move. Check ✓. In general, torques and angular momental ...


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1) 'Gravity is not pulling x down' is a rather confusing way to think about it (as it's always there), but you are right. What's happening is the cross-product, which requires two vectors as an argument. The result is a vector that is perpendicular to both initial vectors. Of course being perpendicular to both still leaves two directions (check it ...


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There is a platter or disc that spins at a high speed inside the drive. When you physically move it you can cause the head to miss-align, especially if you move or shock it with a jerky motion. That sound you're hearing is the hard drive's head trying to re-align itself and continue reading/writing. It's not a good sound and you could be shortening the ...


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Torque could be measured in joules per radian. Torque by angle gives energy.


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$$P(kW)=\frac{\omega(rpm)\times T(Nm)}{60/2\pi \times 1000}$$ So it comes out to be $T=1.43Nm$ if I am not wrong.


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(NOTE: This is not a definitive answer and is largely guesswork, but it might be useful for further answerers.) At first I suspected it was some sort of weak spring or magnetic device which applied an opposing torque to the arm, so as to make the center reading unique. Searching Google, I found this explanation of the theory of a triple-beam balance offered ...


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As mentioned in the comment $M=J\dot{\omega} [Nm]$. However I think you should lay the focus on things like friction and especially wind forces, as they are more likely to exert significant forces on your panel.



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