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Let's say you're the one accelerating towards the other person who is at rest, so after meeting him you're clocks wouldn't agree because of time dilation, right? Let's make the thought experiment more precise. In some inertial frame of reference, a moving clock is located at $x = 0$ when both the coordinate time $t$ and the moving clock time $\tau$ ...


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All inertial reference frames are equivalent. This is the most basic assumption of Special Relativity as well as Newtonian Mechanics. This means that if you are in an inertial reference frame, say, a car moving with constant velocity, you can never tell if the car is moving or not (unless you look out of the window of course). This is not true for a ...


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Time dilation is linked to motion. Be it from acceleration, or velocity, or both. It is because the speed of light is invariant for all observers. If this speed is the same, then what changes is 'time.' As for the who experiences time dilation, the answer is both of you. You both feel time dilation with respect to each other. Time dilation is not 'whoah ...


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The difference between unaccelerated (which includes stationary) and accelerated state is that in case of the latter you can actually feel (and measure) the force causing acceleration. Example: Without looking out the window, you cannot tell whether the train you are in is currently moving or not (relative to Earth) unless there is some acceleration ...


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In an inertial frame , the clocks at different points of space are synchronized. This synchronization issue is important. Once you synchronize Indian time with the American one, there is no paradox. So it is not a time travel. Anyways , the question was interesting.


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No, this is not time travel. Imagine you start in India and adjust your watch to US time before you leave. Nothing has changed. You have neither gained nor lost time, but when you get to the US your watch shows the correct local time.


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Time Travel does not mean going from one time zone to another. You did not get those 6.5 hours back again, they just appear to be back to you because you entered a different time zone. I think this definition of Time Travel by David Lewis’ is perfect and will explain why you are wrong: An object time travels if and only if the difference between its ...



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