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You are wrong, the orbit of the moon is changing, it is receding from the earth so its potential and kinetic energy is changing : The notional tidal bulges are carried ahead of the Earth–Moon axis by the continents as a result of Earth's rotation. The eccentric mass of each bulge exerts a small amount of gravitational attraction on the Moon, with the ...


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The oceans , seas , all objects in the earth are already masses added to the earth and objects attracted to it because the total mass earth had already distorted the space time curvature and any object in the vicinity will follow geodesic lines to the center of that mass, which in turn will be thought of gravity forces. This is according to relativity ...


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Geometry says no. Since the orbital (DISREGARD - direction reverses) (INSERT - period changes) in a horseshoe orbit, the rotation of the body around its axis would have to change as well, and this is not going to happen over the course of a single orbit. Tidal locking takes a long time.


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Lots of these answers expect you to know a lot about the way gravity works. From these, I've managed to come to the answer, and in this post I'll try to dumb it down to my level. To start with, I'd like you to imagine a tray, or an empty biscuit tin - something with a flat base and rims. Now imagine you pour water into this tray (feel free to actually pour ...


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I think you have started from a picture of the tides making water go up and down that is a natural picture to have, but it is wrong: they don't. If that picture were right, you ought to be able to measure the tides just by digging a deep well. What happens is that the influence of the moon (and sun) changes the shape of what is meant by "level" - ...


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Tides are the resultant of attraction from earth (major effect), moon (secondary) and sun. Other planets'influence can be neglected. The position of the moon (and of the sun) cause a slight variation in equipotential surfaces on the earth, and the water as a liquid naturally tends to follow an equipotential surface. Of course those variations are by ...



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