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Tidal movement is various at various geo-oceanic points on our globe. Ocean is water which is fluid, as distinct from the land exposed surfaces on earth which are of course rigid; to extent of not being possible for moon effect to draw the land surface to a bulge. Therefore, ocean depth will bulge in direct response to moon position relative to Earth. ...


3

Unlike sea tide, which is quite complex, as other answers explain, the solid (not-so-solid for this part) Earth tide tends to be simple and the first-order picture can be reasonably approximated by the "bulges" metaphor mentioned in the question. Solid earth tide has an amplitude of ~1 ft typically and it can be safely ignored in most situations, including ...


6

Yes your weight will change. The moon will have a bigger impact than the sun, so you may be heavier during the day (when there is a full moon). The effect has been measured: This figure is on page 93 of "Practical Physics" by Gordon Squires (a classical book, and one that I highly recommend). The method used is a beautiful example of careful experimental ...


95

There is no tidal bulge. This was one of Newton's few mistakes. Newton did get the tidal forcing function correct, but the response to that forcing in the oceans: completely wrong. Newton's equilibrium theory of the tides with its two tidal bulges is falsified by observation. If this hypothesis was correct, high tide would occur when the Moon is at zenith ...


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The answer starts with realizing that no water molecules move as quickly as the moon overhead moves around the earth. Even if there were no land masses in the way and the planet was all water, there is no way that a single water molecule could move around the earth fast enough to keep up with the moon (earth's circumference = 24,000 miles in 12 hours, which ...


1

The specific problem of your location is answered partially in the comments. I suppose it is the six hours that is problematic for you. Edit after reading main answer that there are lots of bulges due to the ocean landscape boundary conditions and fluid mechanics. What does it mean that a bulge, a high twelve foot tide, comes from the west , lets say at ...


18

The picture of high tides on opposite sides of the Earth with a period of about 12 hours (actually 12 hours 25 minutes, due to the rotation of the Earth) is an oversimplification. It's just a starting point. Tides would behave this way in the limit of an all-water Earth with ocean depth so great that it had no effect on the surface wave. But the Earth has ...


1

Yes, the earth has high tides on opposite sides. That is why high tides come about 12 hours apart. The timing of tides at nearby places is very dependent on local landforms. You can probably see a nice gradation of tide time if you look at the towns between Holyhead and Whitby. The delay may be different for high and low tides. The tides get very ...



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