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Rising bubbles of air in a liquid oftentimes are anything but spherical. These bubbles have haphazard shapes because they are rising and because they are interacting with other nearby bubbles. The combination of drag, turbulence, and mutual interactions prevents those bubbles from taking on a nice, simple spherical shape. Here's a rather non-spherical ...


2

It's because normal ice, ice Ih, is less dense than liquid water. Ice Ih forms hexagonal crystals. The bonds in that crystalline structure make the water molecules slightly further apart than they are in the liquid form at the same pressure. That water expands on freezing makes water resist freezing as pressure increases. This in turn makes the fusion point ...


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For the sake of the explanation I will assume you mean a gas bubble in a liquid*. David Hammen names a few conditions for a bubble to be spherical, in fact you could summarize these all as: for a bubble to be spherical the surface tension has to dominate over other forces (per unit length). If surface tension is indeed dominant than the pressure in the ...


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The thing you'll notice about a sphere is that it's symmetrical. very symmetrical. No matter how you rotate it, it looks the same. the surface tension pulls the surface of the bubble into a shape that has even surface tension over the entire bubble. The shape with even surface tension is a sphere. a sphere has the smallest possible surface area for an ...



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