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That $C$ is the specific heat for the given cycle, i.e. $$dQ=nCdT$$ This is for $n$ moles of gas.(not the $n$ you stated in question) I will assume $$PV^z=\text{constant}$$ $$nCdT=dU+PdV$$ $$\int nCdT=\int nC_vdT+\int PdV$$ We will integrate it using Pranjal's method : $$nC\Delta T=nC_v \Delta T+\int \frac{PV^z}{V^z}dV$$ As numerator is a constant, ...


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By definition a reversible adiabatic system has $dQ = 0$. We also know the following from the Clausius Theorem : $dS = \frac{dQ}{T}$ Then it is easy to see that there can be no change in entropy. Note that irreversible adiabatic systems CAN see a change in entropy because in that case the above equation is no longer an equality but an inequality : $dS ...


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The simple answer: Satellites do feel this force, but obviously don't get ripped apart. The tidal forces are simply too small (for the satellites' materials) to actually rip them apart. The Why: Tidal forces happen because one side of an object feels such a larger huge difference in force than the other side. The magnitude of the force not only has to deal ...


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The simplest reaction deuterium and tritium. Tritium is common in big labs (like NIF, JET, Omega) [1]. Tritium sucks - practically speaking. It is expensive, radioactive, and hard to stockpile. Omega spent millions and years on a tritium facility. It may even never be used in fusion power [2]. The next easiest reaction is deuterium with itself. This ...


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I believe the author is thinking here of things like electrochemical work that don't involve a change of volume (but rather, in this case, moving a charge through a potential difference). In this case a full thermodynamic description involves the chemical potential $\mu$, as a later equation shows. (I agree that the description of “different free energies ...


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I don't think I quite understand your question, but I'll do my best. In Thermodynamics, pressure is defined in a bevy of ways. If we look at the Thermodynamic Identity: $$ dU = TdS - PdV + \mu dN$$ (where $U$ is the Energy, $T$ is the Temperature, $S$ is the Entropy, $P$ is the Pressure, $V$ is the Volume, $\mu$ is the Chemical Potential, and $N$ is the ...


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If I understand the question, you are wondering how to justify the statement that a (reverible) adiabatic process is isentropic from the point of view of statistical mechanics (the classical thermodynamics definition makes sense to you). Let us then start with the entropic fundamental relationship, S = S (U, V, N), where U stands for energy, V for volume, N ...



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