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An intuitive answer could run along the following lines. When any two dissimilar electrical conductors (say, A and B) are brought into contact, the distribution of the charge carriers in A and B at the junction gets altered so as to assume a new equilibrium distribution. This new distribution of charge carriers changes the potential drops from A to air ...


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Electricity needs charges particles (or quasi-particles) to conduct. Heat can be conducted with almost any quasi-particle. Diamond is one of the best conductors of heat in existence, and it's because of phonons, ie quasi-particles of lattice vibrations, which are strong because the diamond lattice is strong.


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In regard to the color of the paint or just the paint itself? Because if you are referring to the color applied to a metal then you don't really need a paper to prove that anymore. Its a old idea. Black or darker colors have a higher thermal conductivity because more colors are being absorbed. Lighter colors (like white) have more colors that they are ...


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Although there are several sources of contact resistance, the main source of contact resistance is the oxidation of the contact surfaces. For the electrical case, the oxides of the materials have a much lower electrical conduction (higher resistance) than the materials, therefore the contact area (that is not cleaned and protected) will have a higher ...


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As you have noted, there can be multiple contributions to the thermal conductivity. Basically, any aspect of the material that can move 'independently' can transfer energy from one place to another. Since the electronic subsystem can often be taken as independent of the ionic (lattice) subsystem, those are the two main terms that are written out. However, ...


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There is not a truly simple answer that can be posted on a web site in a few minutes to the last question that was asked by the OP: "How is contact resistance explained?" This is easily shown by reading, for example: Heinz K. Henisch. Semiconductor Contacts: An Approach to Ideas and Models. Oxford Science Publications, 1984.


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This is a very interesting question, especially considering the very recent history of scholarship on electrical contact resistance (a term first coined in 1964 by William Shockley, one of the inventors of the transistor), as well as thermal contact resistance. For the following explanation, I will use this research paper on electrical contact resistance ...


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Another term is thermal resistance, This is incorrect. Thermal resistance is something that prevents heat flow. It is an entirely separate concept from electrical resistance. How is contact resistance explained? To obtain very low resistance in a material like most metals, the electrons must be delocalized from the individual atoms, and free flow ...


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The problem is quite complex to solve quantitively and requires a differential calculus of multi-variable functions, but I'll try to simplify it. Imagine that the object consist of many thin slices across the temperature gradient. Every second slice is a heat container with heat capacity $c \left[ \frac{J}{K}\right]$ and the remaining are heat conductors of ...



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