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Would a theory of everything allow us to calculate any constant? Yes. A theory of everything has to be completely self-contained, so anything it predicts must be derivable from a set of "axioms". In practice, this could mean any variety of things. You could have an infinite series to calculate $\hbar$. Or, you could just start off by defining $\hbar$. When ...


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Forgive my ignorance but it seems to me that the other 3 fundamental forces can be described in electrical terms (hence unification I presume). We use nuclear forces even in power stations. Yet gravity seems to me to be an entirely different entity, it can be seen to be a distortion in space-time. If I picture in my mind a future time where some sort of ...


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A theory must not only explain the existing data, but it must explain it in quantitative terms. Furthermore, it must make testable predictions that differ from other theories. The Simulation Hypothesis does neither. In that respect, it is worse even than String Theory. If you believe ouyr universe is a simulation, the only thing you can trust is mathematics ...


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A good theory is something that doesn't have 100% overlap with another theory, meaning like a Venn Diagram, there are areas where you can test the validity of that theory. While it's true that you can't decisively prove a theory right or wrong, this doesn't mean you cannot demonstrate the correctness of a theory over another. Presumably if the entire ...


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If we know the classical physics theory of the electromagnetic force (and we do), we can guess what the quantum mechanics theory for it should be (and then test with experiment, and as far as we can tell we've guessed correctly). We can do likewise with any classical force. (Although the strong and weak theories were not found by starting from any classical ...


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General Relativity predicts "infinities" at the singularity of a black hole. Quantum Mechanics, Realativistic Quantum Mechanics, and Quantum Field Theory ignore gravity. The Firewall Paradox here give a good explanation of a problem encountered when trying to describe things governed by both Quantum Mechanics and Relativity. Wikipedia talks about quantum ...



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