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The classic color mapping for Hubble is described in Flase-color astrophotography explained. What you have is (in the Hubble palette): Line Freq True False Ha (656.3 nm) Red -- Green S-II (672.4 nm) Red -- Red O-III (500.7 nm) Green -- Blue An example of this for true color from John Nassr at Stardust Observatory at Coming to Life ...


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I find myself now answering my own question but only because the comment feature is not suited to this "comment". I have selected the answer by @HDE 226868 as my answer and primarily due to the linked Space.com reference. Very good answer to my question. In particular, I also thought this quote from the same page as being important as these reasons (below ...


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Sort of. As Space.com writes, The raw Hubble images, as beamed down from the telescope itself, are black and white. But each image is captured using three different filters: red, green and blue. The Hubble imaging team combines those three images into one, in a Technicolor process pioneered in the 1930s. (The same process occurs in digital SLRs, except ...


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In microscopy you can get super-resolved images, either as mentioned before going in the near field (atomic force microscope, NSOM..), or all-optically in the far field. All the super resolution techniques in the far field involve fluorescence. In PALM-STORM you tag your sample with fluorophores which are photo-switchable and you let them blink on-off so to ...


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One of the routine methods for detecting the presence of chemical compounds is infrared spectroscopy, and you'll find infrared spectrometers scattered around any terrestrial orgganic chemistry lab. Organic compounds absorb infrared light at characteristic frequencies, and those absorption lines can be used as a fingerprint to detect the molecule. Exactly ...


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All the answers serve very good explaining why all the telescopes are synced. The only question which remains is that why we are using 4 telescopes or any number of telescopes for that matter. Actually, the quality of data collected increases with the diameter of the telescope. So, they place many telescopes in an array to increase the diameter of the ...


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What you are seeing is the ALMA http://www.eso.org/public/teles-instr/alma/ which is an array of radio telescopes whose data can be combined to simulate the performance of a much bigger radio telescope. So the reason they're moving in synchrony is that they are all looking at the same target.


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The video is of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array, and this is an atronomical interferometer. Interferometers work by combining the signal recorded by many individual dishes to reconstruct the original image. To make this work all the dishes have to be pointed towards the same object, and that's why the video shows them moving in sync.


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If two things pass through one another, it simply means they don't interact, or they interact very weakly. In many ways, this is the "natural" state of affairs: we only tend to think no two things can pass through each other because of the strong interactions between what makes up our everyday world. People, walls and chairs are made of stuff that interacts ...


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if for example a light beam coming from a single point of a galaxy, of a single wavelength, crashes with another wave coming from a different direction and angle, with a different wavelength, how is that they just pass one another and continue as if nothing has happen? In classical electrodynamics, where we treat light as electromagnetic waves that ...


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Your first question can be explained by the classical laws of electromagnetism. Classically, electric fields can be in a superposition where they either add or subtract. This means that waves which criss cross do in fact interact in the sense that they add up to a point of constructive or destructive interference in that region. For your second question ...


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the flux drops off as the square of the distance, but the solid angle subtended by the source drops off the same way, so surface brightness is constant, right? Right. But what happens when you can no longer resolve the source? Then the "solid angle subtended by the source" stops dropping, and only the reduced flux of the entire source can be ...



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