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The answer is "Yes" but not the way you might expect. It is possible to construct a telescope mirror from rotating liquid metal.Mercury used to be used but something like Gallium is safer and better. So print a cradle for it, put in the Gallium, raise the equipment past the melting point (about 30 degC), spin gently to get a parabolic surface, and then ...


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It is easy to understand that the higher the focal length is the narrower the angle of the image from the objective lens or mirror to the eyepiece. So the narrower the angle (higher focal length that is) the deeper the image can go into the eyepiece without losing focus. The lower the focal length is the shorter the depth of focus. It means that you have ...


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The practical limit in terms of sky coverage is probably given by funding. The HDF, according to wikipedia, covers a 24-millionth of the entire sky. We would have to launch thousands of Hubble-like instruments to cover the entire sky at that resolution and sensitivity. Much of that area is covered by the Milky Way and and gas clouds, anyway, so not all deep ...


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You are presumably thinking of the type of wormhole, much beloved of science fiction writers, that links two distant parts of our universe. The trouble is that we have to theory to explain how such wormholes may arise or to describe the properties of such wormholes. The nearest is the Morris-Thorne geometry, but this links two asymptotically flat regions of ...



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