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1

Gauge symmetry is actually not spontaneously broken in the Higgs mechanism; this is a common misconception. See What role does "spontaneously symmetry breaking" played in the "Higgs Mechanism"?. Therefore the Mermin-Wagner theorem does not apply to the Higgs mechanism, and the Higgs mechanism is possible in 1+1D.


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First, note that, strictly speaking, there is no such thing as spontaneous symmetry breaking in Higgs mechanism. I mean, that below and under the Higgs scale (i.e., at scale, at which non-zero Higgs VEV appears) the lagrangian can be rewritten in a gauge invariant way. How is it possible? The answer is that there are different physical states (i.e., ...


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Let me explain @ACuriousMind 's answer with some verbiage. The short, regrettably oracular, answer is that the Fabri-Picasso theorem does not hold in a finite superconductor, since translational invariance fails at its boundaries. Really, I do appreciate this is aggressively obscure: will strive to explain. First of all, if you have a chunk of warm ...


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The popular press's description of this experiment is wildly wrong. It's hard to tell whether they just got it completely wrong on their own, or Scheck got it wrong and they're accurately describing what he said, or if it's some combination of the two. Scheck is a co-author but not the first author, and none of the ridiculous things they represent him as ...


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To be honest, much of this feels like very irresponsible journalism, partly on the part of the BBC and very much so on the part of Science alert. If you're looking for an accessible resource to what the paper does, the cover piece on APS Physics and the phys.org piece are much more sedate and, I think, much more commensurate with what's actually reported ...


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The articles are a little on the hysterical side, but I think they are just saying that violation of CP-symmetry means there must be violation of T-symmetry. T-symmetry means that physical laws are unchanged if we reverse the direction time flows. Classical theories obey T-symmetry, and it seems intuitively obvious that quantum mechanics would as well. But ...



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