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The stiffer the material the rubber material balloon is made of, the larger the pressure difference, and the smaller the balloon will be for the same volume of fluid (air) inside. As the stiffness of the rubber goes to zero, the pressure difference approaches zero, and when the balloon pops, it will be less and less an event. In the limit as the rubber ...


3

It is like a balloon. The pressures of the inner and outer air tend to equilibrate, creating a force over the balloon surface from the higher pressure to the lower one, trying to make them equal (the force goes from inside to outside, when you inflate it, from outside to inside when you deflate it). That's why it changes its size, because the gas pressures ...


30

I drew an image to illustrate the forces at play. For any curved surface of the bubble, the tension pulls parallel to the surface. These forces mostly cancel out, but create a net force inward. This compresses the gas inside the bubble, until the pressure inside is large enough to counteract both the outside pressure, as well as this additional force from ...


18

The increased pressure is caused by the surface tension between the soap and the surrounding air. This can be seen by a simple equilibrium energy argument. The total energy of the system reads $$ E = E_i + E_o + E_s \;, $$ where $E_i$ is the energy associated with the air inside the bubble, $E_s$ is the interfacial energy, and $E_o$ denotes the energy ...


1

There is no quick answer, except if the droplet is completely non-wetting or if it is at least partly wetting. If it is completely non-wetting, it will be move towards the wide side of the funnel until it is a spherical drop touching only its wall. If it is at least partly wetting, it will move to the narrow side until it reaches its apex (if air is ...


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Consider this container in pressurized air but zero-gravity (and ignore surface tension, which would make the liquid ball up). If your guess were right, the liquid would squirt out the small hole on the right, but that ignores the role of the wall on the right, which counters the pressure on the left. Think of the liquid as a collection of horizontal ...


5

For the case that you have drawn, the behavior of the drop is actually the exact opposite of what you mention: it will move from right to left. This is caused by surface tension and the curvature of the droplet caps which creates a larger pressure in the drop at side B than at side A. To make it more quantitative. Let's assume that the funnel is ...


2

Vella and Mahadevan explain the effect as follows: For simplicity, we consider the latter case schematically illustrated in Fig. 2, although the explanation of the clustering of many bubbles is similar. Here, the air–water interface is significantly distorted by the presence of the wall the well-known meniscus effect, and because the bubble is ...



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