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Surface tension is a very interesting phenomenon. One idea as to its origin is to realise that the molecules near the surface of a liquid are not bonded to molecules above the surface. To counteract the attractive forces from the liquid below the separation of the molecules near the surface is greater than that for molecules in the bulk of the liquid. This ...


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There are a couple of different things to think about here. First - surface tension can be thought of as "energy needed to create surface area". In that regard, you can think of a liquid water surface like a 2D spring: the more you stretch it, the more energy it costs. But it is nothing like a spring in the sense that the energy per unit area is constant ...


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Surface tension acts inwardly, towards the body of the object. It is perpendicular to the surface of the object. If the object is curved, it is perpendicular to the tangent of the object's surface.


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They can sometimes have this shape as they stretch downward from a faucet, as seen in this video, however, surface tension usually pulls the droplet into a roughly-spherical package. The reasons that raindrops have "streaky" trajectories in photographs is not that the raindrops are distended by air resistance, but rather that the short exposure time of the ...


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The diagrammatic representation of rain is indeed incorrect. Raindrops do not resemble teardrops. This Youtube video by Minute Physics provides a really cool explaination of that: http://youtu.be/8lBvC7aFB40



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