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Yes, surface tension can change with the area, but is is important to recognize the ensemble you're in. Take first the case of lung surfactants, where you have water, air, and the surfactants in between. If you increase the area while keeping the number of surfactants constant, the surfactants become less densely packed, being in a stretched state of ...


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There is no answer for the total area of the slot. However we can calculate the width of the slot, and as you say this is done with the same method used in How to find out the maximum radius of a hole that can keep water stay in a container by water viscosity?. If we have a cylindrical meniscus then the pressure difference it produces is: $$ \Delta P = ...


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Vafaei & Podowski derived such theory, which seems to agree well with experimental data. Another interesting relation between contact angle and drop height appears in a paper by Srinivasan et. al. (pp. 16-17).


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There is no limit to the length of your slot if it is narrow enough. The circumference of the slot determines the total force available to hold the liquid in place - so as long as the ratio of circumference divided by area is above a critical value, you can keep the water in. That ratio scales with radius for a circular hole - but once you allow elliptical / ...


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It' simple. If the lip profile curls down-ward at the point of pour (or even down and back) the poured liquid cannot dribble, no matter how slowly you pour, because the liquid would have to travel up-wards after leaving the spout in order to do so, and even the most sticky liquid (imagine golden syrup) won't do that. Certain manufacturers of plastic electric ...


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In a subsequent video the same person attributes the phenomenon to mercury's high surface tension and non-wetting, non-wicking chemistry. Mercury makes a convex meniscus at the interface between the mercury and a dry surface. The gaps between the salt grains are smaller than the radius of this meniscus, so the mercury can't flow between them to lift them ...


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Okay, I have a few guesses on what you are trying to say. I've always wondered how much force water exerted through surface tension. By maximum I mean the theoretical pulling/attracting power. If you mean to ask about a water-water interaction similar to that of a magnet-magnet interaction, then surface tension of water has very little to do with ...



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