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The effect of surface tension on bubble size The Young-Laplace law describes the relation of the pressure difference $\Delta p$ on the curvature $C=2/R$ of a spherical bubble: $$\Delta p = 2\frac{\sigma}{R}$$ where proportionality constant is known as the surface tension $\sigma$. Now, if the surface tension were reduced to half its original value ...


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Let me first admit this is a guess on my part, and if it is obviously factually wrong to you, then I will delete this answer as incorrect and my apologies. Have you considered the effects of the modification of other forces, apart from hydrogen bonding, on surface tension? In particular that the introduction of ethanol may reduce the Van den Waal's force ...


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I did not try it myself, but, according to www.chymist.com/soap%20bubbles%20part%202.pdf , "You can catch a bubble or put your finger, hand, or even an arm through a soap film without breaking it by first spreading the soap solution over the skin surface. As long as a surface or your skin is wet, even with water, soap bubbles generally will not break when ...


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To get through the wall of the bundle, I think you can ignore surface tension, as the fly has to ""cut" through it. The air pressure inside any spherical bubble is higher than atmosphere pressure so I don't believe the fly will make it through. From this post Air Pressure inside Soap Bubbles, the higher air pressure will obviously escape to the ...


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If it was just standing with no gravity then round to minimize surface tension. I forget the name of the law but a system will react to minimize external forces. If the drop is falling the drop takes a shape to minimize the external force of the wind resistance. It seeks an aerodynamic shape. The surface comes into play as more surface is more surface ...


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For a given volume (for raindrop - a given amount of water translates to volume with the relevant density value) - the shape with the least surface area is a sphere. This is important because there is an energetic difference between molecules inside the drop and on it's surface - molecules inside the sphere have more connections to other molecules , which ...


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In my experience, in brushes the strongest force acting on the water is the capillary force due to the surface tension in the liquid and the proximity of the hairs in the brush. Surface tension will cause the water to try to "wet" as much of the brush hair as possible - regardless of orientation. If there is excess water, such water will be pulled down by ...


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You should let it hang downwards, otherwise the water will drip down onto the ferrule, which can eventually corrode it. There's pretty much no reason to leave them tip-up: in particular any "local pocket" of humid air is unlikely to be rising much rather than expanding outwards in all directions. If you are worried about the local pocket of humid air during ...


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Surface tension is equivalent to an interfacial energy. They are equivalent because if you increase the area of the interface you increase the energy of the interface, so you have to do work. The work done is the surface tension of the interface times the increase in area. So we can associate a surface tension to gas-solid or liquid-solid interfaces even ...



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