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1

In general you cannot, but in your special case it works out. You should be aware of what the objects in your expression actually are, and how they relate to each other. $X$ is a bosonic field and as such does not feel the presence of gamma matrices at all. Your first line could be rewritten as $$ S = \int \mathrm d^2 \sigma \, \bar \epsilon \gamma^\alpha ...


4

First of all, I'd like to make some remarks: The spectrum of a 2HDM (two-Higgs doublet model) is more complex than you think. There are 2 CP-even bosons ($h$, $H$), a charged scalar ($H^\pm$) and a CP-odd scalar ($A^0$). Usually, we identify the lightest CP-even boson as the scalar particle found at the LHC in 2012 and we assume that the other scalars are ...


0

Your guess goes into the correct direction. There are other particles contributing to $h \to \gamma \gamma$, such as $W^\pm$ bosons. Moreover, these exact branching fractions depend on the parameters of the model. While a scenario with no coupling between the scalar at 125 GeV and the top looks very disfavored, the same model with different parameters ...


4

OP wants to evaluate $$ {\rm Tr}(-)^F e^{-\beta H}=\int_{PBC}[d\phi][d\psi] e^{-S_E[\phi,\psi]},\tag{2.5} $$ in Ref. 1 with periodic boundary conditions (PBC) for both the boson $\phi\equiv x$ and the fermion $\psi$. One can assume that the corresponding Fourier components are labelled by integers $n\in\mathbb{Z}$. One may argue that (2.5) does not depend ...


3

I have not seen the film. But this was not "supersymmetry versus multiverse". It was "supersymmetry without multiverse" versus "supersymmetry with multiverse". According to quantum field theory, a light Higgs boson (light compared to "grand unification" energies) should still look heavy because of virtual particle effects, unless these effects mostly ...



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