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I worked this out a little while back in order to check something said on one of these Nova or other science show specials. I wanted to know how much energy would be required to remove the entire atmosphere of the Earth and whether a supernova (or other astronomical event) could possibly do this. Earth's Atmosphere Let's assume the following quantities: ...


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The other answers are adequate, answering not a thing to the first part of the question in your title: Would a neutrino bomb do anything? But questions in titles are important, so I will reply to the second part, Or can weak force kill you? : Of course the weak force can be lethal. The simplest example is the decay of neutrons , it is a weak decay , but ...


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The Earth is much more massive than its human population. If the Earth is transparent to neutrinos from this device, so are the people on it. In supernova explosions the neutrino flux is large enough to have an important effect on fluid transport. (Kip Thorne discusses this in "Black Holes and Time Warps.") Here is an estimate that to receive a lethal dose ...


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There was also a science fiction story where somebody invented a neutrino bomb. It was claimed that such a bomb would turn all the matter in it to neutrinos, which would escape without damaging anything. The first part doesn't work (think baryon conservation) but the second does. It pointed out that a vacuum would be left, so air would rush in with a ...


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let's talk about efficiency bounds The flux of solar neutrinos at the earth's surface is on the order of $10^{11}$ per cm²/s. Even the largest detectors detect less than a few hundreds neutrinos by day. 7Be Solar Neutrino Measurement with KamLAND Let's assume the incredible facts that such detector has only 10 cm² area and that all the ...


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If the super nova happens in any system it is not safe if you in it. As far a a blast radius You take the class of star to a habitable planet can differ. You would die of radiation poisoning if the Earth survived. The sun is around 150,000,000,000 meters, 1,368 W/m2, 1.7×1017 J from Earth. A super giant star is around 2,100 times bigger than the sun. So ...


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According to Phil Plait and others, anything over 100 light years (and probably a fair bit closer) should be safe. There aren't any known supernova candidates that close. http://earthsky.org/space/supernove-distance https://twitter.com/BadAstronomer/status/201708339904778240 SN 1987A isn't even in our galaxy. It's over 150,000 light years distant.


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SN 1987A is (was?) in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which is gravitationally bound to the Milky Way. This means that its motion relative to us is only minimally affected by cosmological expansion, and talking about it in terms of a $z$ parameter is misleading at best. The best estimates of the distance to SN 1987A are about 168,000 light-years. If you ...


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Of course you won't find it anywhere - SN 1987A is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, just 168000 ly away. At this scales cosmological expansion is negligible compared to other processes so measuring its redshift is says little useful about its distance. $z=0.1$ corresponds roughly to 1 Gly. The universe is HUGE. Here's plot from wikipedia


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The Magellanic clouds are satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. They are right next door. Google says 61 kPc to the LMC which means trivial cosmological redshift.


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Depends what you mean by "produce". In a core collapse supernova, the r-process will produce a huge variety of heavy elements, some of them stable, some not stable. That is probably where most of the Uranium in the universe is made for instance. But even heavier elements with very short lifetimes are likely to be produced too. VY CMa is a fairly large (in ...


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You are confusing planetary formation with the generation of heavy nuclei by supernova explosions. Nucleosynthesis in the history of Big Bang and up to now , is independent of the process of planet formation, though it provides the heavy nuclei in the planets. Nucleosynthesis is the process that creates new atomic nuclei from pre-existing nucleons, ...


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From Wikipedia, from New Scientist According to Krzysztof Stanek of Ohio State University, one of the principal investigators at ASAS-SN, "If it was in our own galaxy, it would shine brighter than the full moon; there would be no night, and it would be easily seen during the day."[6] [6] ...



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