New answers tagged

2

Not at all clear what you mean by "the energy of a star". A ten solar mass star that explodes as a core collapse (type II) supernova releases about $10^{46}$ J, mostly in the form of neutrinos. By comparison, the total rest mass energy of the star is around $2\times 10^{48}$ J. Another comparison would be how much energy a star releases during its ...


-3

IMO is 0% chance. There is no physical evidence of SNe explosions. They should look for $^{60}Fe$ at the sites were Iridium was found (Eltanin impact 2.5 million years ago) There should be another solution to the $^{60}Fe$ problem if the Iridium connection proves to be good. edit add - after 2 unreasonable down votes The age of the events are the same. ...


3

Slim, unless the remnants are still in a close binary system. Almost all massive stars are born in binary systems and some fraction of these survive after a supernova to form neutron star or black hole binary systems. Typical kick velocities appear to be 200-500 km/s (e.g. Janka 2013 http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.0007), which translates (useful fact) to 200-500 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included