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4

As a general rule adding thermal energy doesn't cause electronic transitions. That's because typical electronic transition energies are a few electron volts or around 100kT at room temperature. In a metal the electrons aren't in discrete energy levels but instead reside in a continuous band of energy levels called the conduction band. While thermal energy ...


2

Chiral $p$-wave superconductor and He A phase can be considered being equivalent phases of matter, for the following reason: The fact that the superconductor is charged does not make too much difference in this regard, because it only affects the electromagnetic response (one has Meissner effect, the other does not), but electromagnetic field is an external ...


3

The super-current is carried by the gradient of the phase of the condensate, and there is a finite energy cost associated with this. If the gradient energy is larger than the BCS condensation energy (the energy gained by forming Cooper pairs), then superconductivity will disappear. This is the critical current. In order to be more quantitative, consider ...


1

so you are confusing a superconductor whose macroscopic wavefunction describing only the ground state could be described the way you did, with a superconducting qubit which has a totally different wavefunction and is a junction between two blobs of superconducting material. this introductory article might straighten things out: ...


0

In your case there will be a negative potential on the conductor and the potential on earth is zero. When you ground it there will be a potential difference, so the electrons will move until the potential difference becomes zero ,i.e. electron will move to ground. Then finally the potential on the conductor will also be zero. Since, a neutral metal ball ...


0

First there will be a potential on the conductor and the potential on earth is zero. when we ground it there will be a potential difference, so the electrons will move until the potential difference becomes zero. Then finally the potential on the conductor will also be zero.


2

Yes, in the sense that the charge carriers in the superconductor will experience a force when there's a changing flux.



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