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Unfortunately, there is no hard and fast set of rules for superconductivity yet. The elemental superconductors and several of the metallic alloys seem to follow a set of rules whereas the high Tc cuprate compounds follow a different set of rules. The latest family of superconductors namely the Oxy-Iron- Pnictides/Chalcogenides meet an altogether different ...


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There are two things to consider: What does the potential look like? Is the wave function of the qubit narrow in the flux or charge basis? Potential shape The Hamiltonian of the transmon (a junction in parallel with a capacitor) is $$H_{\text{charge qubit}} = - E_J \cos(\phi) + \frac{(-2en)^2}{2C}$$ where $E_J\equiv I_c \Phi_0 / 2\pi$, $I_c$ is the ...


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The transmon and Cooper pair box share the same design, but operate in opposite limits: Cooper pair box is operated under the condition $E_C\gg E_J$, so the charging energy dominates. While for transmon, it is $E_C\gg E_J$, and it is less sensitive to charge noise because of this parameter choice.


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You did not include the proper infinitesimal imaginary part for frequency in the first equation for the Green's function, which would have given the correct pole structures. So it is not clear whether this is time-ordered, retarded or advanced. The retarded Green's function is $G_R(\omega,p)=\dfrac{\omega+\xi}{(\omega+i\delta)^2-\xi^2-\Delta^2}$ You can ...


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I know that Wikipedia is not the best source for reference, but according to this page the superconducting parts that are cooled by liquid nitrogen in most cases. Most of the superconductors are High TC ones, which still needs to be cooled. Here are some links related to this topic: Toy train Video Paper on HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) Maglev ...


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Superconductors have both a critical temperature, at which they transition to the normal phase, and a critical applied magnetic field value. Once the applied magnetic field is at the critical value, a transition to normal occurs, regardless of the fact that the superconductor is below its critical temperature. The critical value of the applied magnetic ...


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...and V is zero so there is no energy ? The other answers all touch on this part of your question, but none of them explicitly says, that there is no energy dissipated in the superconductor itself. Ohm's Law applies to a conductor. The $I$ in Ohm's Law refers to the current flowing in the conductor, the $V$ refers to the voltage difference between ...


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In a superconductor, the current can keep flowing "forever" since there is no resistance. But since conductors have inductance (in fact, superconductors are used most often to create magnets like for an MRI scanner), applying a voltage would not (immediately) cause an infinite current to flow. It is instructive to see how an MRI magnet is "ramped" (turned ...


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If they have 0 resistance then I (V/R) should be infinite? According to Ohm's law, the voltage and current associated with a conductor are proportional: $$V = R \cdot I$$ where the resistance $R$ is the constant of proportionality. This equation holds for an (ideal) ohmic material. We can rearrange this equation to be $$I = \frac{V}{R}$$ except ...


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The voltage is zero. That's the point. The main way current gets started, like in an NMR magnet, is by inductive coupling.


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@Jerry Schirmer is right, the best way to think of a superconductor is like a skier being able to ski at a constant speed without a slope. The power output is zero since no power is dissipated through any heating affects of the conductor so no energy is transferred except when resistance is met at the other end (like a bulb).



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