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Current going through a superconductor (or otherwise) will form a magnetic field. The potential energy of the magnetic field depends on its size, and the permeability of its surrounding environment. The current will be divided between the two superconductors such that the total magnetic field energy is minimal. Actually, this effect is observable using ...


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I think OP's question is about the p-h symmetry in BdG equation of superconductivity. This is really an exact p-h symmetry (in mathematics), but it is however a redundancy of description. Since it doubles the degree of freedom.


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A simple way to see this is that due to the Meissner effect the magnetic field is expelled from the superconductor and field lines are deformed around the SC. Depending on the geometry of the superconductor the "density" of field lines on his surface is generally higher than the "density" of field lines away from the superconductor. This lead to an effective ...


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How do Cooper pairs form? IMHO it's like Thomas said. As for the electron being attracted to the "wake" of the other electron, IMHO you can get the gist of that via a fluid analogy called the Falaco soliton: The Falaco soliton is a U-tube vorton which is remarkably stable. You make one by dipping a plate into a pool and stroking it forward whilst ...


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This question has been asked and answered many times on this site. Below is my own brief attempt at an answer: The interacton is not strong enough to form bound states. The BCS state is a quantum mechanical state that involves correlated electron pairs (which differs in symmetry from the free electron gas, and leads to spuerconductivity and the Meissner ...


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In both phases you have s-wave pairing in the bulk for the case of a nanowire with proximity induced superconducting correlations through an s-wave superconductor. What happens in the non-trivial phase is that the effective low-energy model is equal to a spin-polarized p-wave superconductor(see this Master thesis: Masterthesis and this paper arXiv: ...


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In either cases the bulk is superconducting. I don't understand why you ask whether it is p-wave or Cooper pair. In this context, "p-wave" always means p-wave pairing, so always a superconductor to begin with. In the topological phase, if the Zeeman field is large the effective low-energy theory is the same as a spinless p-wave superconductor, so in a sense ...


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The film on the surface of the beaker forms by condensation from the saturated vapor above the helium bath. This, by itself, has nothing to do with superfluidity. What is speacial about superfluids is that the film, even though it is only a few dozen atomic layers thick, provides a capillary that the superfluid can flow through without resistance.


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This is not a complete answer to the question, rather a explanation of Kyle Oman's answer. When we (or at least me) think of superconductivity, we have in mind the pairing of electrons to form Cooper pairs. But this pairing is quite weak, and a moderate magentic field can destroy superconductivity. But electrons are not the only particles around! At the ...


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Doubtful you'll find anything within the Solar System, but there are neutron stars, which are thought to have regions which are both superconducting and superfluid (that link is one of the original references from almost 50 years ago - there is a ton of literature on the topic since, you could start with some of these).


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If you are interested what happens in the energy spectrum, then this two papers could be very helpful for you: arXiv:1206.1736 and arXiv:1205.7054. The spin-orbit coupling splits the two spin bands (see in arXiv:1206.1736 Fig. 5a) and the Zeeman term mix them (see in arXiv:1206.1736 Fig. 5b). This looks then in the end like a p-wave pairing in the ...


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At present, the mechanism of the superconductivity in systems like Na$_{0.35}$CoO$_2$ยท1.3H$_2$O are of high interest. The CoO$_2$ layers have been modeled as a spin 1/2 antiferromagnetic Mott insulator on a triangular lattice. By using resonate valence bond mean-field analysis, this supports the view that the superconducting order parameter has the ...



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