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The term "Rosenberg-Coleman effect" originates from the article Heliographic latitude dependence of the dominant polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field. It is also referred to as the "dominant polarity effect". As the Earth orbits the Sun, the Earth travels above and below the equator of the Sun. According to Rosenberg and Coleman, the polarity ...


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The light that we see coming from the Sun is mainly due to black body radiation at its surface. The spectrum of black body radiation is statistical in origin, and as long as there are enough processes contributing to it the black body spectrum is independant of the microscopic details and depends only on the temperature. There is a discussion of this in the ...


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On wikipedia, it says 449000 m or 0.000646 of the sun's radius.


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Let's assume the light from the Sun is parallel, then the shadow of Earth looks like this: The dotted line is the orbit of the satellite at a height $h$ (I've exaggerated the height a bit to make the diagram clearer). All we have to do is calculate the angle $\theta$, because the time the satellite is in the Earth's shadow is simply: $$ t = \tau ...


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I am going with no. If this was a question of sound spreading with an inverse square law, the answer would be yes. Place a cymbal at a distance where it has the same apparent diameter as the sun. On a quiet day, it would be audible. Place 4 cymbals at twice the distance. It would be just as loud. Repeat this idea at the distance of the sun. If the ...


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Let me give a more detailed back-of-the-envelope approximation, which might actually be able to decide, given the conditions of the problem, if we would be able to hear the sound of Sun. Assumptions: The space between Earth and Sun is filled with uniform air. This is a non-physical assumption. It basically means we are ignoring the gravitational effects ...


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Sound, in simple words is vibration of air. So in theory yes, we should hear the Sun if there was a medium like air that could transfer the vibrations. That's just my opinion, of course I can be wrong as this is purely theoretical question and answer.


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Earth is only about 3% closer to the Sun in the winter, which means its intensity would only increase by a maximum of about 6%. There is more atmosphere to block out the UV rays that cause tanning and burns due to the shallower angle of incidence. You tend to wear more clothing (gloves, scarf, etc) that blocks the rays. It's cold, so I doubt a lot of people ...


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It depends on what you call a medium; I assume you refer to matter as a medium. Then, roughly speaking: yes, there is radiation, like light, or heat radiation, that can exist without matter as medium. I think you could call this "energy" in this sense. You can transfer light through a vacuum, of course. The sun, fire or burning magnesium are about matter ...


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That's because the sun is shooting the light at such a small angle that the light have to travel trough the atmosphere for a longer distance. And the atmosphere will decrease the luminosity of the sun. If we could move with the earth in the outer space without rotation, then we would find that the sun is flying upward and downward, drawing a sine wave in the ...


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Like a rocket provides oxygen to burn fuel in space, so the sun provides its own energy. Like you, I'm not necessarily convinced the space in an of itself it not a medium since light travels at a constant speed within it and matter is capable of traveling within it. Planets bleed their own atmospheres into space as well. Please see the about page: ...


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Yes, the Sun and our whole Solar System are revolving around the centre of our galaxy, the Milky Way. Milky Way is a spiral galaxy and hence has four major spiral arms and a central buldge. The Sun (and, of course, the rest of our solar system) is located near the Orion arm, between two major arms (Perseus and Sagittarius).


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The surface of the sun is where local plasma cools enough to recombine and go transparent, the photosphere. You would still be deep within the sun's atmosphere, and it would be LOUD. H-bombs are LOUD at the edge of their fireballs.


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helioseismology is what you need to learn about. yes, there are sound waves in Sun


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At the center of the core $276$ $Watts/m^3$ at 9% of Sun's radius $103$ $Watts/m^3$ 12% of radius $56$ $Watts/m^3$ 14% of radius $20$ $Watts/m^3$ 19% of radius $7$ $Watts/m^3$ 22% of radius $2.2$ $Watts/m^3$ 24% of radius $0.7$ $Watts/m^3$ 29% of radius $0.09$ $Watts/m^3$ Source: B. Stromgrew (1965) reprinted in D. Clayton Principles of Stellar ...


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This is quite a natural confusion. You are correct, were the Solar spectrum purely due to the spectral output of the atoms composing it, we would not be able to get a continuous spectrum. However, the light emitted by the Sun is due to its temperature. All objects that are above $-273.15^{\circ}C$ (so, all objects) emit radiation at a continuous spectrum ...



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