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2

You question isn't specific enough; it needs a little work to clarify the fusion setup. For example, what fuel type are you talking about fusing? Is there confinement, so that this is a thermal fusion reaction, or would just one fusion reaction be sufficient? For example, the temperature required to overcome the Coulomb barrier for deuterium-tritium ...


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The Sun heats up the surface that it's light touches and the heat created causes the air to rise and the light hitting the hot air causes a mirage. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirage


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You can look at data from the ACE and Wind spacecraft at NASA's SPDF CDAWeb. Both of these spacecraft have solid state telescopes that go up to tens to thousands of keV for protons. The data is freely available to anyone.


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I think I'm in a bit over my head, but I don't think it's convection. The Corona, because of the sun's high gravity, thins out very quickly. http://sunearthday.gsfc.nasa.gov/2008/TTT/58_hotcorona.php from the article: It would be like standing in your kitchen far away from the open oven, but feeling temperatures almost 100 times higher than ...


8

You've actually identified a key area of ongoing research known as the coronal heating problem. First, let's get one thing out of the way. You ask: Or is there a type of matter with thermal conductive properties that could accomplish this? There can be no such material. Any material that passively diffuses heat from a cooler region to a warmer one ...


3

A partially reflective Dyson sphere is equivalent to asking what happens if we artificially increase the opacity of the photosphere - akin to covering the star with large starspots - because by reflecting energy back, you are limiting how much (net) flux can actually escape from the photosphere The global effects, depend on the structure of a star and ...


1

An analysis would have to look at the effects over time. With my limited understanding of physics and intuition, I see the outer layers of the star reabsorbing the rays. Where the outer portions of the star until now have experienced large amounts of energy flowing in one direction, now has a net outward energy flow of maybe 1/2 to 1/10 of what it used to. ...


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Camera sensitivity is a common topic. In short they mimic the sensitivity of the human eye. Also your statement that we can see violet in pictures of violet objects is not accurate. It refers to violet as a color, not the 'violet wavelengths' of the spectrum. When we see violet objects we do not see 'violet wavelength' light as much as other wavelengths ...


1

It depends on how realistic solar eclipse do you want. Solar eclipses have two important characteristics: Naked eye visibility of the solar corona. Darkness. To have darkness like the real thing you would need a shadow that's as large as the Moon's umbra during a total ecipse, that's hundreds of kilometers, that would need to be a huge object. That's ...


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As noted, the sun isn't on this path. But, the gravity from a black hole is not radically increased. If the sun became a black hole, its mass wouldn't change, and we would experience the same gravitational force. (I am not sure how close you have to get before you start to see the GR-type effects. But it's pretty close.)


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At the distance of the Earth, the gravitational pull would be the same: its mass does not change just because it's concentrated in a small region of space, and the gravitational field of the black sun at that distance would therefore be unchanged. Our friends at NASA have answered the question essentially the same way: It would exert no more ...



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