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There is a "pseudo-repulsion" between neutrons of the same spin state caused by the Pauli exclusion principle. However, the Pauli exclusion principle only prevents neutrons occupying the same "phase space" (momentum$^3 \times$ volume) and is not usually regarded as a fundamental force. Indeed the derivation of neutron degeneracy pressure assumes that the ...


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First, I shall refer you to this problem of elastic Rutherford scattering (your problem is identical to it because of you use the same force equation, and the angles in both repulsive and attractive are identical), where the question states two results: $$|\Delta {\bf{p}}| = 2 p \sin\left(\frac{\Theta}{ 2}\right)$$ and $$|\Delta {\bf{p}}| = \frac{2 ...


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Nuclear neutrons are not unstable, but free neutrons are unstable and will generally decay via beta decay, becoming a proton and releasing an electron accompanied by an electron antineutrino. Free neutrons have a mean lifetime of approximately 881.5 seconds, meaning the average lifespan of the neutrons is 881.5 seconds. The half-life of neutrons is ...


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Proton is the lightest baryon, neutron mass is almost same but ~1 $MeV/c^2$ heavier than proton. Baryon number must be conserved by nearly all interactions so the proton is a stable hadron. Neutrons by the way considerable stable in the nucleus because of strong interactions. But a free neutron may decay by a weak interaction and since proton is lighter ...


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Free neutrons are unstable, with a half life of about 10 minutes. They almost always decay via $\beta$-decay: $$ \text{n}^0 \rightarrow \text{p}^+ + \text{e}^-+\bar{\nu}_\text{e} $$ This is the same $\beta$-decay that occurs in unstable nuclei, and is possible outside the nucleus because free neutrons are more massive than free protons. The situation in a ...


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Yes. For the phrasing of this question, the neutron qualifies. Neutrons have been slowed and collected, which are diverted from nuclear reactors via beamports. The methods for doing this are quite complicated, but in the final state, they are confined within a box where the "walls" present a nuclear barrier to the neutrons. The neutrons have a wavelength ...



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