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If you have a Poisson distribution with a probability $$P(n)=\frac{\lambda^n}{n!}e^{-\lambda}$$ that there will be $n$ events per bin, then $\lambda$ is the mean number of events per bin. You can get this via a direct calculation, $$ ⟨n⟩ =\sum_{n=0}^\infty nP(n) =\sum_{n=0}^\infty n \frac{\lambda^n}{n!}e^{-\lambda} =\lambda e^{-\lambda}\sum_{n=1}^\infty \...


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According to Jaynes, the different interpretations of probability do matter in QM. Not in terms of experimental outcomes, as the formalism gives the same predictions regardless of interpretation, but on how to interpret some "paradoxical" situations. But the interesting point made by Jaynes is that Bell , because the way he interprets probabilities, made ...


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I'm not sure if this is exactly what you want, but there's a book called Practical Statistics for Astronomers by J.V. Wall and C.R. Jenkins that might fit the bill. According to the Cambridge University Press website (the book is a part of Cambridge Observing Handbooks for Research Astronomers): Astronomy needs statistical methods to interpret data, but ...


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The Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution and the Boltzmann distributions are probability distributions, i.e. functions $\rho(\vec x,\vec v)$ of velocity and position of a particle, that say what is the probability density that the velocity and position belong to the small cube around the given value of them. The Boltzmann distribution is the more general one, $\...



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